Unmanual

manual

[man-yoo-uhl]
adjective
1.
done, operated, worked, etc., by the hand or hands rather than by an electrical or electronic device: a manual gearshift.
2.
involving or using human effort, skill, power, energy, etc.; physical: manual labor.
3.
of or pertaining to the hand or hands: manual deformities.
4.
of the nature of a manual or handbook: manual instructions.
noun
5.
a small book, especially one giving information or instructions: a manual of mathematical tables.
6.
a nonelectric or nonelectronic typewriter; a typewriter whose keys and carriage may be powered solely by the typist's hands.
7.
Military. the prescribed drill in handling a rifle: the manual of arms.
8.
Music. a keyboard, especially one of several belonging to a pipe organ.
9.
Automotive. manual transmission.

Origin:
1375–1425; < Latin manuālis (adj.), manuāle (noun) (something) that can be held in the hand (manu(s) hand + -ālis, -āle -al1, -al2); replacing late Middle English manuel < Middle French < Latin, as above

manually, adverb
nonmanual, adjective
nonmanually, adverb
unmanual, adjective
unmanually, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
manual (ˈmænjʊəl)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to a hand or hands
2.  operated or done by hand: manual controls
3.  physical, as opposed to mental or mechanical: manual labour
4.  by human labour rather than automatic or computer-aided means
5.  of, relating to, or resembling a manual
 
n
6.  a book, esp of instructions or information: a car manual
7.  music one of the keyboards played by hand on an organ
8.  military the prescribed drill with small arms
 
[C15: via Old French from Latin manuālis, from manus hand]
 
'manually
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

manual
c.1400, from L. manualis "of or belonging to the hand," from manus "hand, strength, power over, armed force, handwriting," from PIE *men- "hand, to take in one's hand" (cf. O.E. mund "hand, protection, guardian," Ger. Vormund "guardian," Gk. mane "hand"). Related: Manually.

manual
early 15c., "service book used by a priest," from O.Fr. manuel, from L.L. manuale "case or cover of a book, handbook," neut. of L. manualis (see manual (adj.)). Meaning "a concise handbook" of any sort is from 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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