Unnimble

nimble

[nim-buhl]
adjective, nimbler, nimblest.
1.
quick and light in movement; moving with ease; agile; active; rapid: nimble feet.
2.
quick to understand, think, devise, etc.: a nimble mind.
3.
cleverly contrived: a story with a nimble plot.

Origin:
before 1000; late Middle English nymel, earlier nemel, Old English nǣmel capable, equivalent to nǣm- (variant stem of niman to take; see nim1) + -el -le

nimbleness, noun
nimbly, adverb
unnimble, adjective
unnimbleness, noun
unnimbly, adverb


1. lively, brisk, swift. 2. alert.


1. clumsy.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
nimble (ˈnɪmbəl)
 
adj
1.  agile, quick, and neat in movement: nimble fingers
2.  alert; acute: a nimble intellect
 
[Old English nǣmel quick to grasp, and numol quick at seizing, both from niman to take]
 
'nimbleness
 
n
 
'nimbly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

nimble
"agile, light-footed," c.1300, nemel, from O.E. næmel "quick to grasp" (attested only once), related to niman "to take," from P.Gmc. *nemanan (cf. O.Du., Goth. niman, O.N. nema, O.Fris. nima, Ger. nehmen "to take"), from PIE base *nem- "to divide, distribute, allot" (cf. Gk. nemein "to deal out,"
nemesis "just indignation," L. numerus "number," Lith. nuoma "rent, interest," M.Ir. nos "custom, usage"). With excrescent -b- from c.1500 (cf. limb).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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