UNORDERED

ordered

[awr-derd]
adjective
1.
neatly or conveniently arranged; well-organized: an ordered office.
2.
done according to specific principles or procedures: an ordered method of assembling the parts.
3.
conducted according to certain precepts or rules: an ordered way of life.

Origin:
order + -ed2

orderedness, noun
nonordered, adjective
unordered, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To unordered
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

order
early 13c., "body of persons living under a religious discipline," from O.Fr. ordre (11c.), from earlier ordene, from L. ordinem (nom. ordo) "row, rank, series, arrangement," originally "a row of threads in a loom," from Italic root *ored(h)- "to arrange, arrangement" (cf. ordiri "to begin to weave,"
e.g. in primordial), of unknown origin. Meaning "a rank in the (secular) community" is first recorded c.1300; meaning "command, directive" is first recorded 1540s, from the notion of "to keep in order." Military and honorary orders grew our of the fraternities of Crusader knights. Business and commerce sense is attested from 1837. In natural history, as a classification of living things, it is first recorded 1760. Meaning "condition of a community which is under the rule of law" is from late 15c. Phrase in order to (1650s) preserves etymological notion of "sequence." The word reflects a very medieval notion: "a system of parts subject to certain uniform, established ranks or proportions," and was used of everything from architecture to angels. The verb is mid-13c., from the noun. In short order "without delay" is from 1834, Amer.Eng.; order of battle is from 1769.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

order or·der (ôr'dər)
n.
A taxonomic category of organisms ranking above a family and below a class.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
order   (ôr'dər)  Pronunciation Key 
A group of organisms ranking above a family and below a class. See Table at taxonomy.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

order definition


In biology, the classification lower than a class and higher than a family. Dogs and cats belong to the order of carnivores; human beings, monkeys, and apes belong to the order of primates. Flies and mosquitoes belong to the same order; so do birch trees and oak trees. (See Linnean classification.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature