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precede

[pri-seed] /prɪˈsid/
verb (used with object), preceded, preceding.
1.
to go before, as in place, order, rank, importance, or time.
2.
to introduce by something preliminary; preface:
to precede one's statement with a qualification.
verb (used without object), preceded, preceding.
3.
to go or come before.
noun
4.
Journalism. copy printed at the beginning of a news story presenting late bulletins, editorial notes, or prefatory remarks.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English preceden < Latin praecēdere. See pre-, cede
Related forms
precedable, adjective
unpreceded, adjective
Can be confused
precede, proceed.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for unpreceded

precede

/prɪˈsiːd/
verb
1.
to go or be before (someone or something) in time, place, rank, etc
2.
(transitive) to preface or introduce
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Latin praecēdere to go before, from prae before + cēdere to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unpreceded

precede

v.

early 15c., "lead the way; occur before," from Middle French preceder and directly from Latin praecedere "to go before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cedere "to go" (see cede). Meaning "to walk in front of" is late 15c.; that of "to go before in rank or importance" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Preceded; preceding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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