unprobational

probation

[proh-bey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of testing.
2.
the testing or trial of a person's conduct, character, qualifications, or the like.
3.
the state or period of such testing or trial.
4.
Law.
a.
a method of dealing with offenders, especially young persons guilty of minor crimes or first offenses, by allowing them to go at large under supervision of a probation officer.
b.
the state of having been conditionally released.
5.
Education. a trial period or condition of students in certain educational institutions who are being permitted to redeem failures, misconduct, etc.
6.
the testing or trial of a candidate for membership in a religious body or order, for holy orders, etc.
7.
Archaic. proof.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English probacion < Latin probātiōn- (stem of probātiō). See probate, -ion

probational, probationary [proh-bey-shuh-ner-ee] , adjective
probationship, noun
nonprobation, noun
unprobational, adjective
unprobationary, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
probation (prəˈbeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  a system of dealing with offenders by placing them under the supervision of a probation officer
2.  on probation
 a.  under the supervision of a probation officer
 b.  undergoing a test period
3.  a trial period, as for a teacher, religious novitiate, etc
4.  the act of proving or testing
5.  a period during which a new employee may have his employment terminated on the grounds of unsuitability
 
pro'bational
 
adj
 
pro'bationary
 
adj
 
pro'bationally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

probation
early 15c., "trial, experiment, test," from O.Fr. probacion (14c.), from L. probationem (nom. probatio) "inspection, examination," noun of action from probare "to test" (see prove). Meaning "testing of a person's conduct" is from early 15c.; theological sense first recorded
1520s; criminal justice sense is first recorded in U.S. c.1878.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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