unsummoned

summon

[suhm-uhn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to call upon to do something specified.
2.
to call for the presence of, as by command, message, or signal; call.
3.
to call or notify to appear at a specified place, especially before a court: to summon a defendant.
4.
to authorize or order a gathering of; call together by authority, as for deliberation or action: to summon parliament.
5.
to call into action; rouse; call forth (often. followed by up ): to summon all one's courage.

Origin:
1175–1225; < Medieval Latin summonēre to summon, Latin: to remind unofficially, suggest, equivalent to sum- sum- + monēre to remind, warn; replacing Middle English somonen < Old French semondre, somondre < Vulgar Latin *summonere, Latin summonēre, as above

summonable, adjective
summoner, noun
resummon, verb (used with object)
unsummonable, adjective
unsummoned, adjective


1-3. See call.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
summon (ˈsʌmən)
 
vb
1.  to order to come; send for, esp to attend court, by issuing a summons
2.  to order or instruct (to do something) or call (to something): the bell summoned them to their work
3.  to call upon to meet or convene
4.  (often foll by up) to muster or gather (one's strength, courage, etc)
 
[C13: from Latin summonēre to give a discreet reminder, from monēre to advise]
 
'summonable
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

summon
c.1200, from Anglo-Fr., O.Fr. sumundre "summon," from V.L. *summundre "to call, cite," from L. summonere "hint to," from sub "under" + monere "warn, advise" (see monitor). Summons "authoritative call to be at a certain place for a certain purpose" is late 13c., from O.Fr.
sumunse, noun use of fem. pp. of somondre. Summoner "petty officer who cites persons to appear in court" is from early 14c.; contracted form sumner is from mid-14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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