untame

tame

[teym]
adjective, tamer, tamest.
1.
changed from the wild or savage state; domesticated: a tame bear.
2.
without the savageness or fear of humans normal in wild animals; gentle, fearless, or without shyness, as if domesticated: That lion acts as tame as a house cat.
3.
tractable, docile, or submissive, as a person or the disposition.
4.
lacking in excitement; dull; insipid: a very tame party.
5.
spiritless or pusillanimous.
6.
not to be taken very seriously; without real power or importance; serviceable but harmless: They kept a tame scientist around.
7.
brought into service; rendered useful and manageable; under control, as natural resources or a source of power.
8.
cultivated or improved by cultivation, as a plant or its fruit.
verb (used with object), tamed, taming.
9.
to make tame; domesticate; make tractable.
10.
to deprive of courage, ardor, or zest.
11.
to deprive of interest, excitement, or attractiveness; make dull.
12.
to soften; tone down.
13.
to harness or control; render useful, as a source of power.
14.
to cultivate, as land or plants.
verb (used without object), tamed, taming.
15.
to become tame.

Origin:
before 900; (adj.) Middle English; Old English tam; cognate with Dutch tam, German zahm, Old Norse tamr; (v.) Middle English tamen, derivative of the adj.; replacing Middle English temen to tame, Old English temian, derivative of tam; cognate with Old Norse temja, Gothic gatamjan; akin to Latin domāre to tame

tamely, adverb
tameness, noun
tamer, noun
overtame, adjective
overtamely, adverb
overtameness, noun
untame, adjective
untamely, adverb
untameness, noun
untamed, adjective
well-tamed, adjective


3. meek, subdued. 4. flat, empty, vapid, boring, tedious, uninteresting. 5. cowardly, dastardly. 9. break, subdue. 12. calm, mollify.


1. wild.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
tame (teɪm)
 
adj
1.  changed by man from a naturally wild state into a tractable, domesticated, or cultivated condition
2.  (of animals) not fearful of human contact
3.  lacking in spirit or initiative; meek or submissive: a tame personality
4.  flat, insipid, or uninspiring: a tame ending to a book
5.  slow-moving: a tame current
 
vb
6.  to make tame; domesticate
7.  to break the spirit of, subdue, or curb
8.  to tone down, soften, or mitigate
 
[Old English tam; related to Old Norse tamr, Old High German zam]
 
'tamable
 
adj
 
'tameable
 
adj
 
tama'bility
 
n
 
tamea'bility
 
n
 
'tamableness
 
n
 
'tameableness
 
n
 
'tameless
 
adj
 
'tamely
 
adv
 
'tameness
 
n
 
'tamer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tame
O.E. tom, tam "domesticated, docile," from P.Gmc. *tamaz (cf. O.N. tamr, O.S., O.Fris., M.L.G., M.Du. tam, O.H.G. zam, Ger. zahm "tame," Goth. tamjan "to tame"), from PIE *deme- "to constrain, to force, to break (horses)" (cf. Skt. damayati "tames;" Pers. dam "a tame animal;" Gk. daman "to tame, subdue,"
dmetos "tame;" L. domare "to tame, subdue;" O.Ir. damnaim "I tie up, fasten, I tame, subdue"). Possible ulterior connection with PIE *dem- "house, household" (see domestic). Meaning "spiritless, weak, dull" is recorded from 1602. The verb is M.E. teme, from O.E. temian "make tame;" form altered 14c. by infl. of the adj.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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