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tithe

[tahyth] /taɪð/
noun
1.
Sometimes, tithes. the tenth part of agricultural produce or personal income set apart as an offering to God or for works of mercy, or the same amount regarded as an obligation or tax for the support of the church, priesthood, or the like.
2.
any tax, levy, or the like, especially of one-tenth.
3.
a tenth part or any indefinitely small part of anything.
verb (used with object), tithed, tithing.
4.
to give or pay a tithe or tenth of (produce, money, etc.).
5.
to give or pay tithes on (crops, income, etc.).
6.
to exact a tithe from (a person, community, parish, etc.).
7.
to levy a tithe on (crops, income, etc.).
verb (used without object), tithed, tithing.
8.
to give or pay a tithe.
Also, British, tythe.
Origin
900
before 900; (noun) Middle English ti(ghe)the, Old English teogotha tenth; (v.) Middle English tithen, Old English teogothian to take the tenth of, derivative of the noun
Related forms
titheless, adjective
untithed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for untithed

tithe

/taɪð/
noun
1.
(often pl) (Christianity) a tenth part of agricultural or other produce, personal income, or profits, contributed either voluntarily or as a tax for the support of the church or clergy or for charitable purposes
2.
any levy, esp of one tenth
3.
a tenth or very small part of anything
verb
4.
(transitive)
  1. to exact or demand a tithe or tithes from (an individual or group)
  2. to levy a tithe upon (a crop or amount of produce, etc)
5.
(intransitive) to pay a tithe or tithes
Derived Forms
tither, noun
Word Origin
Old English teogoth; related to Old Frisian tegotha, Old Saxon tegotho, Old High German zehando, Old Norse tīundi, Gothic taihunda
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for untithed

tithe

n.

Old English teogoþa (Anglian), teoþa (West Saxon) "tenth," from Proto-Germanic *tegunthon, *tekhunthon. Retained in ecclesiastical sense while the form was replaced in ordinal use by tenth (influenced by ten).

v.

Old English teoþian, from the root of tithe (n.). Related: Tithed; tithing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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untithed in Culture

tithe definition


A tenth part of one's annual income contributed to support the clergy or a church. The Mosaic law required the Israelites to pay a tithe for the support of worship.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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untithed in the Bible

a tenth of the produce of the earth consecrated and set apart for special purposes. The dedication of a tenth to God was recognized as a duty before the time of Moses. Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek (Gen. 14:20; Heb. 7:6); and Jacob vowed unto the Lord and said, "Of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee." The first Mosaic law on this subject is recorded in Lev. 27:30-32. Subsequent legislation regulated the destination of the tithes (Num. 18:21-24, 26-28; Deut. 12:5, 6, 11, 17; 14:22, 23). The paying of the tithes was an important part of the Jewish religious worship. In the days of Hezekiah one of the first results of the reformation of religion was the eagerness with which the people brought in their tithes (2 Chr. 31:5, 6). The neglect of this duty was sternly rebuked by the prophets (Amos 4:4; Mal. 3:8-10). It cannot be affirmed that the Old Testament law of tithes is binding on the Christian Church, nevertheless the principle of this law remains, and is incorporated in the gospel (1 Cor. 9:13, 14); and if, as is the case, the motive that ought to prompt to liberality in the cause of religion and of the service of God be greater now than in Old Testament times, then Christians outght to go beyond the ancient Hebrew in consecrating both themselves and their substance to God. Every Jew was required by the Levitical law to pay three tithes of his property (1) one tithe for the Levites; (2) one for the use of the temple and the great feasts; and (3) one for the poor of the land.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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