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putty1

[puht-ee] /ˈpʌt i/
noun, plural putties.
1.
a compound of whiting and linseed oil, of a doughlike consistency when fresh, used to secure windowpanes, patch woodwork defects, etc.
2.
any of various other compounds used for similar purposes.
3.
any of various substances for sealing the joints of tubes or pipes, composed of linseed oil with red lead, white lead, iron oxide, etc.
4.
a creamy mixture of lime and water, partially dried and mixed with sand and plaster of Paris to make a finish plaster coat.
6.
any person or thing easily molded, influenced, etc.:
We were putty in his hands.
7.
light brownish- or yellowish-gray.
verb (used with object), puttied, puttying.
8.
to secure, cover, etc., with putty.
Idioms
9.
up to putty, Australian Slang. worthless or useless.
Origin
1625-1635
1625-35; < French potée, literally, (something) potted. See pot1, -ee
Related forms
unputtied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for up to putty

putty

/ˈpʌtɪ/
noun (pl) -ties
1.
a stiff paste made of whiting and linseed oil that is used to fix glass panes into frames and to fill cracks or holes in woodwork, etc
2.
any substance with a similar consistency, function, or appearance
3.
a mixture of lime and water with sand or plaster of Paris used on plaster as a finishing coat
4.
(as modifier): a putty knife
5.
6.
a person who is easily influenced or persuaded: he's putty in her hands
7.
  1. a colour varying from a greyish-yellow to a greyish-brown or brownish-grey
  2. (as adjective): putty-coloured
8.
(Austral, informal) up to putty, worthless or useless
verb -ties, -tying, -tied
9.
(transitive) to fix, fill, or coat with putty
Word Origin
C17: from French potée a potful
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for up to putty

putty

n.

1630s, "type of plasterer's cement," from French potée "polishing powder" (12c.), originally "pot-full, contents of a pot," from Old French pot "container" (see pot (n.1)). Meaning "soft mixture for sealing window panes" first recorded 1706. Figurative use in reference to one easily influenced is from 1924. Putty knife attested from 1834.

v.

1734, from putty (n.). Related: Puttied; puttying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for up to putty

putty

noun

A very malleable or biddable person or persons: they'll be putty and do exactly what you want (as they should) (1924+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for up to putty

putty

cementing material made of whiting (finely powdered calcium carbonate) and boiled linseed oil. It is beaten or kneaded to the consistency of dough and is used to secure sheets of glass in sashes, to stop crevices in woodwork, and to fill nail holes. Whiting putty of a high grade consists of 85 to 90 percent whiting blended with 10 to 15 percent boiled linseed oil. White-lead whiting putty has an admixture of 10 percent white lead, reducing the amount of whiting proportionately. Prepared putty should roll freely in the hands without exuding oil. Synthetic glazing and filling compounds have supplanted putty in many applications

Learn more about putty with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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