usurp

[yoo-surp, -zurp]
verb (used with object)
1.
to seize and hold (a position, office, power, etc.) by force or without legal right: The pretender tried to usurp the throne.
2.
to use without authority or right; employ wrongfully: The magazine usurped copyrighted material.
verb (used without object)
3.
to commit forcible or illegal seizure of an office, power, etc.; encroach.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English < Latin ūsūrpāre to take possession through use, equivalent to ūsū (ablative of ūsus use (noun)) + -rp-, reduced form of -rip-, combining form of rapere to seize + -āre infinitive ending

usurper, noun
usurpingly, adverb
nonusurping, adjective
nonusurpingly, adverb
self-usurp, verb (used without object)
unusurped, adjective
unusurping, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
usurp (juːˈzɜːp)
 
vb
to seize, take over, or appropriate (land, a throne, etc) without authority
 
[C14: from Old French usurper, from Latin ūsūrpāre to take into use, probably from ūsus use + rapere to seize]
 
usur'pation
 
n
 
u'surpative
 
adj
 
u'surpatory
 
adj
 
u'surper
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

usurp
early 14c., from O.Fr. usurper, from L. usurpare "make use of, seize for use," in L.L. "to assume unlawfully," from usus "a use" (see use) + rapere "to seize" (see rapid).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Historians have viewed her both as a brazen usurper and a gender-bending innovator.
The irregularity of this proceeding stirred up all the world against the
  usurper.
The dead king and the usurper become positive and negative aspects of the
  father figure.
The picture one retains, from a wider point of view, is that of an overwhelm
  ing usurper rather than of a great ruler.
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