variable resistor

Science Dictionary
variable resistor  
See under resistor.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

variable resistor

adjustable resistor used in applications that require the adjustment of current or the varying of resistance in an electric circuit. The rheostat can adjust generator characteristics, dim lights, and start or control the speed of motors. Its resistance element can be a metal wire or ribbon, carbon, or a conducting liquid, depending on the application. For average currents, the metallic type is most common; for very small currents, the carbon type is used; and for large currents the electrolytic type, in which electrodes are placed in a conducting fluid, is most suitable. A special type of rheostat is the potentiometer, an instrument that measures an unknown voltage or potential difference by balancing it, wholly or in part, by a known potential difference. A more common potentiometer is simply a resistor with two fixed terminals and a third terminal connected to a variable contact arm; it is used for such purposes as a volume control in audio equipment.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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