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venture

[ven-cher] /ˈvɛn tʃər/
noun
1.
an undertaking involving uncertainty as to the outcome, especially a risky or dangerous one:
a mountain-climbing venture.
2.
a business enterprise or speculation in which something is risked in the hope of profit; a commercial or other speculation.
3.
the money, ship, cargo, merchandise, or the like, on which risk is taken in a business enterprise or speculation.
4.
Obsolete. hazard or risk.
verb (used with object), ventured, venturing.
5.
to expose to hazard; risk:
to venture one's fortune; to venture one's life.
6.
to take the risk of; brave the dangers of:
to venture a voyage into space.
7.
to undertake to express, as when opposition or resistance appears likely to follow; be bold enough; dare:
I venture to say that you are behaving foolishly.
8.
to take the risk of sending.
verb (used without object), ventured, venturing.
9.
to make or embark upon a venture; dare to go:
He ventured deep into the jungle.
10.
to take a risk; dare; presume:
to venture on an ambitious program of reform.
11.
to invest venture capital.
adjective
12.
of or pertaining to an investment or investments in new businesses:
a venture fund.
Idioms
13.
at a venture, according to chance; at random:
A successor was chosen at a venture.
Origin
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English, aphetic variant of aventure adventure
Related forms
venturer, noun
preventure, noun, verb, preventured, preventuring.
unventured, adjective
Synonyms
5. endanger, imperil, jeopardize. 10. See dare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ventures
  • Many of the ventures were attended with great danger even in times of peace.
  • His own editorial ventures were brilliant in their audacity but dismal in their financial returns.
  • Whereupon the guest ventures that people are afraid of chocolate because it is so fattening or so hot.
  • The state claims final authority to prescribe standards and to supervise even private educational ventures.
  • We have all heard disaster stories of foreign campuses forced to close and of offshore ventures falling afoul of host governments.
  • It was a big week for two distance-learning ventures.
  • On the other hand, experiencing the ultimate rejection made the prospect of failure in other ventures less scary.
  • So far, these e-book ventures aren't requiring publishers to sign exclusive agreements with them.
  • But ventures around the country are seriously exploring new business strategies.
  • Commercial ventures do thrive on generalizations about millennial students.
British Dictionary definitions for ventures

venture

/ˈvɛntʃə/
verb
1.
(transitive) to expose to danger; hazard: he ventured his life
2.
(transitive) to brave the dangers of (something): I'll venture the seas
3.
(transitive) to dare (to do something): does he venture to object?
4.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to express in spite of possible refutation or criticism: I venture that he is not that honest
5.
(intransitive; often foll by out, forth, etc) to embark on a possibly hazardous journey, undertaking, etc: to venture forth upon the high seas
noun
6.
an undertaking that is risky or of uncertain outcome
7.
  1. a commercial undertaking characterized by risk of loss as well as opportunity for profit
  2. the merchandise, money, or other property placed at risk in such an undertaking
8.
something hazarded or risked in an adventure; stake
9.
(archaic) chance or fortune
10.
at a venture, at random; by chance
Derived Forms
venturer, noun
Word Origin
C15: variant of aventureadventure
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ventures

venture

v.

mid-15c., "to risk the loss" (of something), shortened form of aventure, itself a form of adventure. General sense of "to dare, to presume" is recorded from 1550s. Noun sense of "risky undertaking" first recorded 1560s; meaning "enterprise of a business nature" is recorded from 1580s. Venture capital is attested from 1943.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with ventures
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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11
14
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