vesselled

vessel

[ves-uhl]
noun
1.
a craft for traveling on water, now usually one larger than an ordinary rowboat; a ship or boat.
2.
an airship.
3.
a hollow or concave utensil, as a cup, bowl, pitcher, or vase, used for holding liquids or other contents.
4.
Anatomy, Zoology. a tube or duct, as an artery or vein, containing or conveying blood or some other body fluid.
5.
Botany. a duct formed in the xylem, composed of connected cells that have lost their intervening partitions, that conducts water and mineral nutrients. Compare tracheid.
6.
a person regarded as a holder or receiver of something, especially something nonmaterial: a vessel of grace; a vessel of wrath.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French vessel, va(i)ssel < Latin vāscellum, equivalent to vās (see vase) + -cellum diminutive suffix

vesseled; especially British, vesselled, adjective
unvesseled, adjective

vassal, vessel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
vessel (ˈvɛsəl)
 
n
1.  any object used as a container, esp for a liquid
2.  a passenger or freight-carrying ship, boat, etc
3.  an aircraft, esp an airship
4.  anatomy a tubular structure that transports such body fluids as blood and lymph
5.  botany a tubular element of xylem tissue consisting of a row of cells in which the connecting cell walls have broken down
6.  rare a person regarded as an agent or vehicle for some purpose or quality: she was the vessel of the Lord
 
[C13: from Old French vaissel, from Late Latin vascellum urn, from Latin vās vessel]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vessel
c.1300, "container," from O.Fr. vessel (Fr. vaisseau) from L. vascellum "small vase or urn," also "a ship," dim. of vasculum, itself a dim. of vas "vessel." Sense of "ship, boat" is found in Eng. c.1300. "The association between hollow utensils and boats appears in all languages" [Weekley]. Meaning "canal
or duct of the body" (esp. for carrying blood) is attested from late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

vessel ves·sel (věs'əl)
n.
A duct, canal, or other tube that contains or conveys a body fluid such as blood or lymph.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
vessel   (věs'əl)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. A blood vessel.

  2. A long, continuous column made of the lignified walls of dead vessel elements, along which water flows in the xylem of angiosperms.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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