vibrate

[vahy-breyt]
verb (used without object), vibrated, vibrating.
1.
to move rhythmically and steadily to and fro, as a pendulum; oscillate.
2.
to move to and fro or up and down quickly and repeatedly; quiver; tremble.
3.
(of sounds) to produce or have a quivering or vibratory effect; resound.
4.
to thrill, as in emotional response.
5.
to move between alternatives or extremes; fluctuate; vacillate.
verb (used with object), vibrated, vibrating.
6.
to cause to move rhythmically and steadily to and fro, swing, or oscillate.
7.
to cause to move to and fro or up and down quickly and repeatedly; cause to quiver or tremble.
8.
to give forth or emit by, or as by, vibration.
9.
to measure or indicate by vibration or oscillation: a pendulum vibrating seconds.

Origin:
1610–20; < Latin vibrātus (past participle of vibrāre to move to and fro); see -ate1

vibratingly, adverb
nonvibrating, adjective
revibrate, verb, revibrated, revibrating.
unvibrated, adjective
unvibrating, adjective


2. See shake. 3. echo.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
vibrate (vaɪˈbreɪt)
 
vb
1.  to move or cause to move back and forth rapidly; shake, quiver, or throb
2.  (intr) to oscillate
3.  to send out (a sound) by vibration; resonate or cause to resonate
4.  (intr) to waver
5.  physics to undergo or cause to undergo an oscillatory or periodic process, as of an alternating current; oscillate
6.  rare (intr) to respond emotionally; thrill
 
[C17: from Latin vibrāre]
 
vibratile
 
adj
 
vi'brating
 
adj
 
vi'bratingly
 
adv
 
'vibratory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vibrate
1616, from L. vibratus, pp. of vibrare "move quickly to and fro, shake," from PIE *w(e)ib- "move quickly to and fro" (cf. Lith. wyburiu "to wag" (the tail), Dan. vippe, Du. wippen "to swing," O.E. wipan "to wipe"). Musical vibrato (1861) reproduces the It. form.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They vibrate enough to shake the steering wheel at idle, a turnoff to a
  luxury-brand buyer seeking smooth refinement.
Fluorescent bulbs vibrate, adding a medically forensic, anemic brightness.
In the labs, which are in the lower decks, the floor and counters vibrate with
  the engine sounds.
Hot objects emit infrared radiation, and the electrons in these metals vibrate
  when exposed to such radiation.
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