vicious

[vish-uhs]
adjective
1.
addicted to or characterized by vice; grossly immoral; depraved; profligate: a vicious life.
2.
given or readily disposed to evil: a vicious criminal.
3.
reprehensible; blameworthy; wrong: a vicious deception.
4.
spiteful; malicious: vicious gossip; a vicious attack.
5.
unpleasantly severe: a vicious headache.
6.
characterized or marred by faults or defects; faulty; unsound: vicious reasoning.
7.
savage; ferocious: They all feared his vicious temper.
8.
(of an animal) having bad habits or a cruel or fierce disposition: a vicious bull.
9.
Archaic. morbid, foul, or noxious.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin vitiōsus, equivalent to viti(um) fault, vice1 + -ōsus -ous

viciously, adverb
viciousness, noun
unvicious, adjective
unviciously, adverb
unviciousness, noun

vicious, viscose, viscous.


1. abandoned, corrupt, iniquitous, sinful. 4. malevolent.


1. moral.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
vicious (ˈvɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  wicked or cruel; villainous: a vicious thug
2.  characterized by violence or ferocity: a vicious blow
3.  informal unpleasantly severe; harsh: a vicious wind
4.  characterized by malice: vicious lies
5.  (esp of dogs, horses, etc) ferocious or hostile; dangerous
6.  characterized by or leading to vice
7.  invalidated by defects; unsound: a vicious inference
8.  obsolete noxious or morbid: a vicious exhalation
 
[C14: from Old French vicieus, from Latin vitiōsus full of faults, from vitium a defect]
 
'viciously
 
adv
 
'viciousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vicious
early 14c. (implied in viciously), "of the nature of vice, wicked," from Anglo-Fr. vicious, O.Fr. vicieus, from L. vitiosus "faulty, defective, corrupt," from vitium "fault" (see vice (1)). Meaning "inclined to be savage or dangerous" is first recorded 1711 (originally of animals,
especially horses); that of "full of spite, bitter, severe" is from 1825. In law, "marred by some inherent fault" (late 14c.), hence also this sense in logic (c.1600); cf. vicious circle in reasoning (c.1792), which was given a general sense of "a situation in which action and reaction intensify one another" by 1839.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

vicious definition

[ˈvɪʃəs]
  1. mod.
    great; excellent. : Man, this burger is really vicious.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Example sentences
It viciously attacks the policies and the character of a president who belongs
  to the opposing political party.
My whole body was sore, as if a gang of boxers had punched me viciously.
To see you even after you were viciously attacked with a smile on your face
  astounded me.
They even criticized their publisher viciously in public.
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