vigor

[vig-er]
noun
1.
active strength or force.
2.
healthy physical or mental energy or power; vitality.
3.
energetic activity; energy; intensity: The economic recovery has given the country a new vigor.
4.
force of healthy growth in any living matter or organism, as a plant.
5.
active or effective force, especially legal validity.
Also, especially British, vigour.


Origin:
1300–50; Middle English vigo(u)r < Anglo-French; Middle French vigeur < Latin vigor force, energy, equivalent to vig(ēre) to be vigorous, thrive + -or -or1

vigorless, adjective


2. drive, force, strength.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To vigour
Collins
World English Dictionary
vigour or (US) vigor (ˈvɪɡə)
 
n
1.  exuberant and resilient strength of body or mind; vitality
2.  substantial effective energy or force: the vigour of the tempest
3.  forcefulness; intensity: the vigour of her complaints
4.  the capacity for survival or strong healthy growth in a plant or animal: hybrid vigour
5.  the most active period or stage of life, manhood, etc; prime
6.  chiefly (US) legal force or effectiveness; validity (esp in the phrase in vigour)
 
[C14: from Old French vigeur, from Latin vigor activity, from vigēre to be lively]
 
vigor or (US) vigor
 
n
 
[C14: from Old French vigeur, from Latin vigor activity, from vigēre to be lively]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vigor
c.1300, from Anglo-Fr. vigour, O.Fr. vigor, from L. vigorem (nom. vigor) "liveliness, activity, force," from vigere "be lively, flourish, thrive," from PIE *wog-/*weg- "be lively or active" (see vigil).

vigour
British spelling of vigor (q.v.); for suffix, see -or.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
They celebrate the great achievements of the past and tackle with vigour the problems of the present.
The issues he identifies are being addressed with tremendous vigour now.
There has been a gain of accuracy, but a serious loss of vigour.
His genius was varied and copious, and he showed his capacity to do almost
  every kind of dramatic work with immense vigour.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature