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voltage

[vohl-tij] /ˈvoʊl tɪdʒ/
noun, Electricity
1.
electromotive force or potential difference expressed in volts.
Origin of voltage
1885-1890
1885-90; volt1 + -age
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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British Dictionary definitions for voltage

voltage

/ˈvəʊltɪdʒ/
noun
1.
an electromotive force or potential difference expressed in volts
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for voltage
n.

1890, from volt + -age.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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voltage in Medicine

voltage volt·age (vōl'tĭj)
n.
Electromotive force or potential difference, usually expressed in volts.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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voltage in Science
voltage
  (vōl'tĭj)   
A measure of the difference in electric potential between two points in space, a material, or an electric circuit, expressed in volts.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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voltage in Technology

electronics
(Or "potential difference", "electro-motive force" (EMF)) A quantity measured as a signed difference between two points in an electrical circuit which, when divided by the resistance in Ohms between those points, gives the current flowing between those points in Amperes, according to Ohm's Law. Voltage is expressed as a signed number of Volts (V). The voltage gradient in Volts per metre is proportional to the force on a charge.
Voltages are often given relative to "earth" or "ground" which is taken to be at zero Volts. A circuit's earth may or may not be electrically connected to the actual earth.
The voltage between two points is also given by the charge present between those points in Coulombs divided by the capacitance in Farads. The capacitance in turn depends on the dielectric constant of the insulators present.
Yet another law gives the voltage across a piece of circuit as its inductance in Henries multiplied by the rate of change of current flow through it in Amperes per second.
A simple analogy likens voltage to the pressure of water in a pipe. Current is likened to the amount of water (charge) flowing per unit time.
(1995-12-04)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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