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voltmeter

[vohlt-mee-ter] /ˈvoʊltˌmi tər/
noun, Electricity
1.
a calibrated instrument for measuring the potential difference between two points.
Origin
1880-1885
1880-85; volt1 + -meter
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for voltmeters

voltmeter

/ˈvəʊltˌmiːtə/
noun
1.
an instrument for measuring potential difference or electromotive force
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for voltmeters

voltmeter

n.

1882, from volt + meter (n.3).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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voltmeters in Science
voltmeter
  (vōlt'mē'tər)   
An instrument used for measuring the difference in voltage between two points in an electric circuit. Voltmeters typically make use of an ammeter that measures current flow across a known resistance inside the voltmeter; direct-current voltages can then be determined by Ohm's law. Digital voltmeters employ A/D converters to provide the numerical value of the voltage displayed. Compare ohmmeter.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for voltmeters

voltmeter

instrument that measures voltages of either direct or alternating electric current on a scale usually graduated in volts, millivolts (0.001 volt), or kilovolts (1,000 volts). The typical commercial or laboratory standard voltmeter in use today is likely to employ an electromechanical mechanism in which current flowing through turns of wire is translated into a reading of voltage. Other types of voltmeters include the electrostatic voltmeter, which uses electrostatic forces and, thus, is the only voltmeter to measure voltage directly rather than by the effect of current. The potentiometer operates by comparing the voltage to be measured with known voltage; it is used to measure very low voltages. The electronic voltmeter, which has largely replaced the vacuum-tube voltmeter, uses amplification or rectification (or both) to measure either alternating- or direct-current voltages. The current needed to actuate the meter movement is not taken from the circuit being measured; hence, this type of instrument does not introduce errors of circuit loading

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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