vow

[vou]
noun
1.
a solemn promise, pledge, or personal commitment: marriage vows; a vow of secrecy.
2.
a solemn promise made to a deity or saint committing oneself to an act, service, or condition.
3.
a solemn or earnest declaration.
verb (used with object)
4.
to make a vow of; promise by a vow, as to God or a saint: to vow a crusade or a pilgrimage.
5.
to pledge or resolve solemnly to do, make, give, observe, etc.: They vowed revenge.
6.
to declare solemnly or earnestly; assert emphatically (often followed by a clause as object): She vowed that she would take the matter to court.
7.
to dedicate or devote by a vow: to vow oneself to the service of God.
verb (used without object)
8.
to make a vow.
9.
to make a solemn or earnest declaration.
Idioms
10.
take vows, to enter a religious order or house.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French vo(u) < Latin vōtum, neuter of vōtus, past participle of vovēre to vow

vower, noun
vowless, adjective
unvowed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
vow (vaʊ)
 
n
1.  a solemn or earnest pledge or promise binding the person making it to perform a specified act or behave in a certain way
2.  a solemn promise made to a deity or saint, by which the promiser pledges himself to some future act, course of action, or way of life
3.  take vows to enter a religious order and commit oneself to its rule of life by the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, which may be taken for a limited period as simple vows or as a perpetual and still more solemn commitment as solemn vows
 
vb
4.  (tr; may take a clause as object or an infinitive) to pledge, promise, or undertake solemnly: he vowed that he would continue; he vowed to return
5.  (tr) to dedicate or consecrate to God, a deity, or a saint
6.  (tr; usually takes a clause as object) to assert or swear emphatically
7.  archaic (intr) to declare solemnly
 
[C13: from Old French vou, from Latin vōtum a solemn promise, from vovēre to vow]
 
'vower
 
n
 
'vowless
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vow
c.1300, from Anglo-Fr. and O.Fr. vou, from L. votum "a vow, wish, promise, dedication," noun use of neut. of votus, pp. of vovere "to promise solemnly, pledge, dedicate, vow," from PIE base *ewegwh- "to speak solemnly, vow" (cf. Skt. vaghat- "one who offers a sacrifice;" Gk. eukhe "vow, wish," eukhomai
"I pray"). The verb is attested from c.1300, from O.Fr. vouer.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Vows definition


voluntary promises which, when once made, were to be kept if the thing vowed was right. They were made under a great variety of circumstances (Gen. 28: 18-22; Lev. 7:16; Num. 30:2-13; Deut. 23:18; Judg. 11:30, 39; 1 Sam. 1:11; Jonah 1:16; Acts 18:18; 21:23).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
In what is becoming a tradition on the glacier, couples are using it to
  exchange wedding vows.
After all, in marriage vows these days, people still do typically promise to be
  faithful.
The right is awash in proposed vows, offered up by interest groups seeking to
  bind candidates.
She vows to avenge him, which drives the plot in the rest of the books.
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