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7 Essential Words of Fall

Bishop

[bish-uh p] /ˈbɪʃ əp/
noun
1.
Elizabeth, 1911–79, U.S. poet.
2.
Hazel (Gladys) 1906–1998, U.S. chemist and businesswoman.
3.
John Peale, 1892–1944, U.S. poet and essayist.
4.
Morris (Gilbert) 1893–1973, U.S. humorist, poet, and biographer.
5.
William Avery ("Billy") 1894–1956, Canadian aviator: helped to establish Canadian air force.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for w bishop

bishop

/ˈbɪʃəp/
noun
1.
(in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Greek Orthodox Churches) a clergyman having spiritual and administrative powers over a diocese or province of the Church See also suffragan related adjective episcopal
2.
(in some Protestant Churches) a spiritual overseer of a local church or a number of churches
3.
a chesspiece, capable of moving diagonally over any number of unoccupied squares of the same colour
4.
mulled wine, usually port, spiced with oranges, cloves, etc
Word Origin
Old English biscop, from Late Latin epīscopus, from Greek episkopos, from epi- + skopos watcher

Bishop

/ˈbɪʃəp/
noun
1.
Elizabeth. 1911–79, US poet, who lived in Brazil. Her poetry reflects her travelling experience, esp in the tropics
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for w bishop

bishop

n.

Old English bisceop "bishop, high priest (Jewish or pagan)," from Late Latin episcopus, from Greek episkopos "watcher, overseer," a title for various government officials, later taken over in a Church sense, from epi- "over" (see epi-) + skopos "watcher," from skeptesthai "look at" (see scope (n.1)). Given a specific sense in the Church, but the word also was used in the New Testament as a descriptive title for elders, and continues as such in some non-hierarchical Christian sects.

A curious example of word-change, as effected by the genius of different tongues, is furnished by the English bishop and the French évêque. Both are from the same root, furnishing, perhaps the only example of two words from a common stem so modifying themselves in historical times as not to have a letter in common. (Of course many words from a far off Aryan stem are in the same condition.) The English strikes off the initial and terminal syllables, leaving only piscop, which the Saxon preference for the softer labial and hissing sounds modified into bishop. Évêque (formerly evesque) merely softens the p into v and drops the last syllable. [William S. Walsh, "Handy-Book of Literary Curiosities," Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1892]
Late Latin episcopus in Spanish became obispo. Cognate with Old Saxon biscop, Old High German biscof. The chess piece (formerly archer, before that alfin) was so called from 1560s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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w bishop in Medicine

Bishop Bish·op (bĭsh'əp), J. Michael. Born 1936.

American microbiologist. He shared a 1989 Nobel Prize for discovering a sequence of genes that can cause cancer when mutated.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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w bishop in Science
Bishop
  (bĭsh'əp)   
American molecular biologist who, working with Harold Varmus, discovered oncogenes. For this work, Bishop and Varmus shared the 1989 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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w bishop in Culture

bishop definition


In some Christian churches, a person appointed to oversee a group of priests or ministers and their congregations. In the Anglican Communion, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Roman Catholic Church, bishops are considered the successors of the Twelve Apostles.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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w bishop in the Bible

an overseer. In apostolic times, it is quite manifest that there was no difference as to order between bishops and elders or presbyters (Acts 20:17-28; 1 Pet. 5:1, 2; Phil. 1:1; 1 Tim. 3). The term bishop is never once used to denote a different office from that of elder or presbyter. These different names are simply titles of the same office, "bishop" designating the function, namely, that of oversight, and "presbyter" the dignity appertaining to the office. Christ is figuratively called "the bishop [episcopos] of souls" (1 Pet. 2:25).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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