Dictionary.com Unabridged

warehouse

[n. wair-hous; v. wair-houz, -hous]
noun, plural warehouses [wair-hou-ziz] .
1.
a building, or a part of one, for the storage of goods, merchandise, etc.
2.
British. a large retail store.
3.
a building, or a part of one, in which wholesalers keep large stocks of merchandise, which they display and sell to retailers.
verb (used with object), warehoused [wair-houzd] , warehousing [wair-hou-zing] .
4.
to place, deposit, or store in a warehouse.
5.
to set aside or accumulate, as for future use.
6.
to place in a government or bonded warehouse, to be kept until duties are paid.
7.
Informal. to confine (the mentally ill) to large institutions for long-term custodial care.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English; see ware1, house

miniwarehouse, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To warehousing
Collins
World English Dictionary
warehouse
 
n
1.  a place where goods are stored prior to their use, distribution, or sale
2.  See bonded warehouse
3.  chiefly (Brit) a large commercial, esp wholesale, establishment
 
vb
4.  (tr) to store or place in a warehouse, esp a bonded warehouse

warehousing (ˈwɛəˌhaʊzɪŋ)
 
n
stock exchange an attempt to maintain the price of a company's shares or to gain a significant stake in a company without revealing the true identity of the purchaser. Shares are purchased through an insurance company, a unit trust, or nominees

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

warehouse
1349, from ware (n.) + house. Cf. Du. warenhuis, Ger. warenhaus. Meaning "large impersonal institution" is Amer.Eng. colloquial, first attested 1970. The verb is recorded from 1799; in the colloquial sense, from 1972.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
They spare the publisher the burden of warehousing paper copies.
He wants to build a national network of cold-storage, warehousing, and distribution centres for both branded and unbranded goods.
The majority of the fatalities were among people who worked in transportation, warehousing and utilities.
Warehousing is normally lender lingo for packaging a number of loans for sale to investors.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature