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weary

[weer-ee] /ˈwɪər i/
adjective, wearier, weariest.
1.
physically or mentally exhausted by hard work, exertion, strain, etc.; fatigued; tired:
weary eyes; a weary brain.
2.
characterized by or causing fatigue:
a weary journey.
3.
impatient or dissatisfied with something (often followed by of):
weary of excuses.
4.
characterized by or causing impatience or dissatisfaction; tedious; irksome:
a weary wait.
verb (used with or without object), wearied, wearying.
5.
to make or become weary; fatigue or tire:
The long hours of work have wearied me.
6.
to make or grow impatient or dissatisfied with something or at having too much of something (often followed by of):
The long drive had wearied us of desert scenery. We had quickly wearied at such witless entertainment.
Origin of weary
900
before 900; (adj.) Middle English wery, Old English wērig; cognate with Old Saxon -wōrig; akin to Old English wōrian to crumble, break down, totter; (v.) Middle English werien, Old English wēr(i)gian, derivative of the adj.
Related forms
wearily, adverb
weariness, noun
wearyingly, adverb
outweary, verb (used with object), outwearied, outwearying.
self-weariness, noun
self-weary, adjective
unweary, adjective
unwearying, adjective
Can be confused
wary, weary, leery.
Synonyms
1. spent. See tired1 . 4. tiresome, wearisome. 5. exhaust. 6. irk; jade.
Antonyms
1. energetic. 4. interesting. 6. interest.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for wearied
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Then abruptly they failed, as if the night, wearied with their importunity, had fallen upon the speakers and choked them.

    Bella Donna Robert Hichens
  • wearied with anxiety and hope deferred, they turned in as the night advanced.

    Down the Rhine Oliver Optic
  • They immediately made two of the men with me put down their loads, and took them up themselves to relieve the wearied ones.

  • The long conversation I had held with my attendant had wearied me, weak and exhausted as I was.

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • He was now nearly sixty, wearied by adversity, and a sufferer from gout and obesity.

  • This is the third day I have eaten here, and I am wearied by this terrible lonesomeness.

    Foma Gordyeff Maxim Gorky
British Dictionary definitions for wearied

weary

/ˈwɪərɪ/
adjective -rier, -riest
1.
tired or exhausted
2.
causing fatigue or exhaustion
3.
caused by or suggestive of weariness: a weary laugh
4.
(postpositive; often foll by of or with) discontented or bored, esp by the long continuance of something
verb -ries, -rying, -ried
5.
to make or become weary
6.
to make or become discontented or impatient, esp by the long continuance of something
Derived Forms
wearily, adverb
weariness, noun
wearying, adjective
wearyingly, adverb
Word Origin
Old English wērig; related to Old Saxon wōrig, Old High German wuorag drunk, Greek hōrakian to faint
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wearied

weary

adj.

Old English werig "tired," related to worian "to wander, totter," from West Germanic *worigaz (cf. Old Saxon worig "weary," Old High German wuorag "intoxicated"), of unknown origin.

v.

Old English wergian (intransitive), gewergian (transitive), from the source of weary (adj.). Related: Wearied; wearying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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