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weary

[weer-ee] /ˈwɪər i/
adjective, wearier, weariest.
1.
physically or mentally exhausted by hard work, exertion, strain, etc.; fatigued; tired:
weary eyes; a weary brain.
2.
characterized by or causing fatigue:
a weary journey.
3.
impatient or dissatisfied with something (often followed by of):
weary of excuses.
4.
characterized by or causing impatience or dissatisfaction; tedious; irksome:
a weary wait.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), wearied, wearying.
5.
to make or become weary; fatigue or tire:
The long hours of work have wearied me.
6.
to make or grow impatient or dissatisfied with something or at having too much of something (often followed by of):
The long drive had wearied us of desert scenery. We had quickly wearied at such witless entertainment.
Origin
900
before 900; (adj.) Middle English wery, Old English wērig; cognate with Old Saxon -wōrig; akin to Old English wōrian to crumble, break down, totter; (v.) Middle English werien, Old English wēr(i)gian, derivative of the adj.
Related forms
wearily, adverb
weariness, noun
wearyingly, adverb
outweary, verb (used with object), outwearied, outwearying.
self-weariness, noun
self-weary, adjective
unweary, adjective
unwearying, adjective
Can be confused
wary, weary, leery.
Synonyms
1. spent. See tired1 . 4. tiresome, wearisome. 5. exhaust. 6. irk; jade.
Antonyms
1. energetic. 4. interesting. 6. interest.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for wearied
  • They performed extraordinary feats without pause and never wearied of killing, killing, killing.
  • But the captain had gradually wearied of it, and the thought of his approaching marriage grew more distasteful to him every day.
  • The world is wearied of statesmen whom democracy has degraded into politicians.
  • They answer to our basic, frequently camouflaged need to keep on moving, not to be wearied or ground down by a lumpen life.
  • wearied of politics, feeling old, he retired at the end of his second.
  • All give the effect of wearied, futile, unconscious indifference.
  • Public support for the war was waning and his troops were wearied and demoralized.
  • She looked haggard and wearied, but the eyes she raised to her hostess were resolute.
  • He was never known either to be wearied in a hunt or silenced in a debate.
British Dictionary definitions for wearied

weary

/ˈwɪərɪ/
adjective -rier, -riest
1.
tired or exhausted
2.
causing fatigue or exhaustion
3.
caused by or suggestive of weariness a weary laugh
4.
(postpositive; often foll by of or with) discontented or bored, esp by the long continuance of something
verb -ries, -rying, -ried
5.
to make or become weary
6.
to make or become discontented or impatient, esp by the long continuance of something
Derived Forms
wearily, adverb
weariness, noun
wearying, adjective
wearyingly, adverb
Word Origin
Old English wērig; related to Old Saxon wōrig, Old High German wuorag drunk, Greek hōrakian to faint
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wearied

weary

adj.

Old English werig "tired," related to worian "to wander, totter," from West Germanic *worigaz (cf. Old Saxon worig "weary," Old High German wuorag "intoxicated"), of unknown origin.

v.

Old English wergian (intransitive), gewergian (transitive), from the source of weary (adj.). Related: Wearied; wearying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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