well constructed

construct

[v. kuhn-struhkt; n. kon-struhkt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to build or form by putting together parts; frame; devise.
2.
Geometry. to draw (a figure) fulfilling certain given conditions.
noun
3.
something constructed.
4.
an image, idea, or theory, especially a complex one formed from a number of simpler elements.

Origin:
1400–50 for earlier past participle sense; 1655–65 for current senses; late Middle English < Latin constrūctus (past participle of construere to construe), equivalent to con- con- + strūc- (variant stem of struere to build) + -tus past participle suffix

constructible, adjective
overconstruct, verb (used with object)
preconstruct, verb (used with object)
quasi-constructed, adjective
well-constructed, adjective


1. erect, form. See make1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
construct
 
vb
1.  to put together substances or parts, esp systematically, in order to make or build (a building, bridge, etc); assemble
2.  to compose or frame mentally (an argument, sentence, etc)
3.  geometry to draw (a line, angle, or figure) so that certain requirements are satisfied
 
n
4.  something formulated or built systematically
5.  a complex idea resulting from a synthesis of simpler ideas
6.  psychol a model devised on the basis of observation, designed to relate what is observed to some theoretical framework
 
[C17: from Latin constructus piled up, from construere to heap together, build, from struere to arrange, erect]
 
con'structible
 
adj
 
con'structor
 
n
 
con'structer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

construct
1660s, from L. construct-, pp. stem of construere "to heap up" (see construction). The noun is recorded from 1871 in linguistics, 1890 in psychology, 1933 in the general sense of "anything constructed." Related: constructed (pp. adj., 1784); constructing (1788).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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