well speaking

speaking

[spee-king]
noun
1.
the act, utterance, or discourse of a person who speaks.
2.
speakings, literary works composed for recitation, as ancient bardic poetry; oral literature.
adjective
3.
that speaks.
4.
used in, suited to, or involving speaking or talking: the speaking voice.
5.
of or pertaining to declamation.
6.
giving information as if by speech: a speaking proof of a thing.
7.
highly expressive: speaking eyes.
8.
lifelike: a speaking likeness.
Idioms
9.
not on speaking terms, not or no longer in a relationship of open, willing, or ready communication, as because of resentment or estrangement: They had a squabble during the holidays, and now they're not on speaking terms.
10.
on speaking terms,
a.
in a relationship close enough for or limited to friendly superficialities: I don't know the hosts well, but we are certainly on speaking terms.
b.
in a relationship of open, willing, or ready communication: Now that the debt has been settled, I hope you and your partner are on speaking terms again.

Origin:
1200–50; Middle English; see speak, -ing1, -ing2

speakingly, adverb
speakingness, noun
nonspeaking, adjective
well-speaking, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
speaking (ˈspiːkɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  (prenominal) eloquent, impressive, or striking
2.  a.  able to speak
 b.  (in combination) able to speak a particular language: French-speaking

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

speak
O.E. specan, variant of sprecan "to speak" (class V strong verb; past tense spræc, pp. sprecen), from P.Gmc. *sprekanan (cf. O.S. sprecan, O.Fris. spreka, M.Du. spreken, O.H.G. sprehhan, Ger. sprechen "to speak," O.N. spraki "rumor, report"), cognate with L. spargere "to strew" (speech as a "scattering"
of words; see sparse). The -r- began to drop out in Late West Saxon and was gone by mid-12c., perhaps from infl. of Dan. spage "crackle," in a slang sense of "speak" (cf. crack in slang senses having to do with speech, e.g. wisecrack, cracker, all it's cracked up to be). Rare variant forms without -r- also are found in M.Du. (speken) and O.H.G. (spehhan). Not the primary word for "to speak" in O.E. ("Beowulf" prefers maþelian, from mæþel "assembly, council," from root of metan "to meet;" cf. Gk. agoreuo "to speak," originally "speak in the assembly," from agora "assembly").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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