well-armed

armed

[ahrmd]
adjective
1.
bearing firearms; having weapons: a heavily armed patrol.
2.
maintained by arms: armed peace.
3.
involving the use of weapons: armed conflict.
4.
equipped: The students came armed with their pocket calculators.
5.
(especially of an animal) covered protectively, as by a shell.
6.
fortified; made secure: Armed by an inveterate optimism, he withstood despair.
7.
(of an artillery shell, bomb, missile, etc.) having the fuze made operative.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English; see arm2, -ed2

half-armed, adjective
well-armed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
armed1 (ɑːmd)
 
adj
1.  equipped with or supported by arms, armour, etc
2.  prepared for conflict or any difficulty
3.  (of an explosive device) prepared for use; having a fuse or detonator installed
4.  (of plants) having the protection of thorns, spines, etc

armed2 (ɑːmd)
 
adj
a.  having an arm or arms
 b.  (in combination): long-armed; one-armed

well-armed
 
adj
1.  having many or good weapons: well-armed forces
2.  suitably prepared in advance: well armed for an argument

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

arm
"body part," O.E. earm "arm," from P.Gmc. *armaz (cf. O.S., M.Du., Ger. arm, O.N. armr, O.Fris. erm), from PIE base *ar- "fit, join" (cf. Skt. irmah "arm," Armenian armukn "elbow," O.Prus. irmo "arm," Gk. arthron "a joint," L. armus "shoulder"). Arm of the sea was in O.E. Arm-twister "powerful persuader"
is from 1938. Arm-wrestling is from 1971.
"They wenten arme in arme yfere Into the gardyn" [Chaucer]

arm
"weapon," c.1300, from O.Fr. armes (pl.), 11c., from L. arma "weapons," lit. "tools, implements (of war)," from PIE base *ar- "fit, join." The notion seems to be "that which is fitted together." Meaning "heraldic insignia" (in coat of arms, etc.) is early 14c.; originally they were borne on shields of
fully armed knights or barons. The verb meaning "to furnish with weapons" is from c.1200.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

arm 1 (ärm)
n.
An upper limb of the human body, connecting the hand and wrist to the shoulder.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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