well-contrasted

contrast

[v. kuhn-trast, kon-trast; n. kon-trast]
verb (used with object)
1.
to compare in order to show unlikeness or differences; note the opposite natures, purposes, etc., of: Contrast the political rights of Romans and Greeks.
verb (used without object)
2.
to exhibit unlikeness on comparison with something else; form a contrast.
3.
Linguistics. to differ in a way that can serve to distinguish meanings: The sounds (p) and (b) contrast in the words “pin” and “bin.”
noun
4.
the act of contrasting; the state of being contrasted.
5.
a striking exhibition of unlikeness.
6.
a person or thing that is strikingly unlike in comparison: The weather down here is a welcome contrast to what we're having back home.
7.
opposition or juxtaposition of different forms, lines, or colors in a work of art to intensify each element's properties and produce a more dynamic expressiveness.
8.
Photography. the relative difference between light and dark areas of a print or negative.
9.
Television. the brightness ratio of the lightest to the darkest part of the television screen image.
10.
Linguistics. a difference between linguistic elements, especially sounds, that can serve to distinguish meanings.

Origin:
1480–90; (v.) < Middle French contraster < Italian contrastare to contest < Latin contrā- contra-1 + stāre to stand; (noun) earlier contraste < French < Italian contrasto conflict, derivative of contrastare

contrastable, adjective
contrastably, adverb
contrastingly, adverb
quasi-contrasted, adjective
uncontrastable, adjective
uncontrastably, adverb
uncontrasted, adjective
uncontrasting, adjective
well-contrasted, adjective

compare, contrast (see usage note at compare).


1. differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, oppose.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
contrast
 
vb
1.  (often foll by with) to distinguish or be distinguished by comparison of unlike or opposite qualities
 
n
2.  distinction or emphasis of difference by comparison of opposite or dissimilar things, qualities, etc (esp in the phrases by contrast, in contrast toorwith)
3.  a person or thing showing notable differences when compared with another
4.  (in painting) the effect of the juxtaposition of different colours, tones, etc
5.  a.  (of a photographic emulsion) the degree of density measured against exposure used
 b.  the extent to which adjacent areas of an optical image, esp on a television screen or in a photographic negative or print, differ in brightness
6.  psychol the phenomenon that when two different but related stimuli are presented close together in space and/or time they are perceived as being more different than they really are
 
[C16: (n): via French from Italian, from contrastare (vb), from Latin contra- against + stare to stand]
 
con'trastable
 
adj
 
con'trastably
 
adv
 
con'trasting
 
adj
 
con'trastive
 
adj
 
con'trastively
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

contrast
late 17c., from Fr. contraster, from It. contrastare "stand out against," from V.L. *contrastare "to withstand," from L. contra "against" (see contra) + stare "to stand," from PIE base *sta- "to stand" (see stet). M.E. had contrest "to fight against,
to withstand," which became extinct. Modern word re-introduced as an art term. Related: Contrasted (1764).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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