well-obeyed

obey

[oh-bey]
verb (used with object)
1.
to comply with or follow the commands, restrictions, wishes, or instructions of: to obey one's parents.
2.
to comply with or follow (a command, restriction, wish, instruction, etc.).
3.
(of things) to respond conformably in action to: The car obeyed the slightest touch of the steering wheel.
4.
to submit or conform in action to (some guiding principle, impulse, one's conscience, etc.).
verb (used without object)
5.
to be obedient: to agree to obey.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English obeien < Old French obeir < Latin oboedīre, equivalent to ob- ob- + audīre to hear; -oe- for expected -ū- is unclear

obeyable, adjective
obeyer, noun
obeyingly, adverb
unobeyed, adjective
unobeying, adjective
well-obeyed, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
obey (əˈbeɪ)
 
vb
1.  to carry out (instructions or orders); comply with (demands)
2.  to behave or act in accordance with (one's feelings, whims, etc)
 
[C13: from Old French obéir, from Latin oboedīre, from ob- to, towards + audīre to hear]
 
o'beyer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

obey
late 13c., from O.Fr. obeir, from L. oboedire "obey, pay attention to, give ear," lit. "listen to," from ob "to" + audire "listen, hear" (see audience). Same sense development is in cognate O.E. hiersumnian.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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