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rear2

[reer] /rɪər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to take care of and support up to maturity:
to rear a child.
2.
to breed and raise (livestock).
3.
to raise by building; erect.
4.
to raise to an upright position:
to rear a ladder.
5.
to lift or hold up; elevate; raise.
verb (used without object)
6.
to rise on the hind legs, as a horse or other animal.
7.
(of a person) to start up in angry excitement, hot resentment, or the like (usually followed by up).
8.
to rise high or tower aloft:
The skyscraper rears high over the neighboring buildings.
Idioms
9.
rear its (ugly) head. head (def 85).
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English reren, Old English rǣran to raise; cognate with Gothic -raisjan, Old Norse reisa
Related forms
unreared, adjective
well-reared, adjective
Synonyms
1. nurture, raise. 3. construct. 5. loft.
Usage note
1. See raise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for well-reared

rear1

/rɪə/
noun
1.
the back or hind part
2.
the area or position that lies at the back: a garden at the rear of the house
3.
the section of a military force or procession farthest from the front
4.
the buttocks See buttock
5.
bring up the rear, to be at the back in a procession, race, etc
6.
in the rear, at the back
7.
(modifier) of or in the rear: the rear legs, the rear side
Word Origin
C17: probably abstracted from rearward or rearguard

rear2

/rɪə/
verb
1.
(transitive) to care for and educate (children) until maturity; bring up; raise
2.
(transitive) to breed (animals) or grow (plants)
3.
(transitive) to place or lift (a ladder, etc) upright
4.
(transitive) to erect (a monument, building, etc); put up
5.
(intransitive) often foll by up. (esp of horses) to lift the front legs in the air and stand nearly upright
6.
(intransitive; often foll by up or over) (esp of tall buildings) to rise high; tower
7.
(intransitive) to start with anger, resentment, etc
Derived Forms
rearer, noun
Word Origin
Old English rǣran; related to Old High German rēren to distribute, Old Norse reisa to raise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for well-reared

rear

n.

"hindmost part," c.1600, abstracted from rerewarde "rear guard, hindmost part of an army or fleet" (mid-14c.), from Anglo-French rerewarde, Old French rieregarde, from Old French adverb riere "behind" (from Latin retro "back, behind;" see retro-) + Old French garde (see guard (n.)). Or the word may be a shortened form of arrear (see arrears).

As a euphemism for "buttocks" it is attested from 1796. Rear admiral is first attested 1580s, apparently so called from ranking "behind" an admiral proper. Rear-view (mirror) is recorded from 1926.

v.

Old English ræran "to raise, build up, create, set on end; arouse, excite, stir up," from Proto-Germanic *raizijanau "to raise," causative of *risanan "to rise" (see raise (v.)). Meaning "bring into being, bring up" (as a child) is recorded from early 15c.; that of "raise up on the hind legs" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Reared; rearing.

"attack in the rear," 17c., from rear (n.).

adj.

c.1300, from Old French rere (see rear (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with well-reared
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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