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amend

[uh-mend] /əˈmɛnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to alter, modify, rephrase, or add to or subtract from (a motion, bill, constitution, etc.) by formal procedure:
Congress may amend the proposed tax bill.
2.
to change for the better; improve:
to amend one's ways.
Synonyms: ameliorate, better.
Antonyms: worsen.
3.
to remove or correct faults in; rectify.
verb (used without object)
4.
to grow or become better by reforming oneself:
He amends day by day.
Synonyms: improve, ameliorate.
Antonyms: worsen.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English amenden < Old French amender < Latin ēmendāre to correct, equivalent to ē- e-1 + mend(a) blemish + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
amendable, adjective
amender, noun
nonamendable, adjective
reamend, verb
unamendable, adjective
unamended, adjective
unamending, adjective
well-amended, adjective
Can be confused
amenable, amendable, emendable.
Synonym Study
3. Amend, emend both mean to improve by correcting or by freeing from error. Amend is the general term, used of any such correction in detail: to amend spelling, punctuation, grammar. Emend usually applies to the correction of a text in the process of editing or preparing for publication; it implies improvement in the sense of greater accuracy: He emended the text of the play by restoring the original reading.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for wellamended

amend

/əˈmɛnd/
verb (transitive)
1.
to improve; change for the better
2.
to remove faults from; correct
3.
to alter or revise (legislation, a constitution, etc) by formal procedure
Derived Forms
amendable, adjective
amender, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French amender, from Latin ēmendāre to emend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wellamended

amend

v.

early 13c., "to free from faults, rectify," from Old French amender (12c.), from Latin emendare "to correct, free from fault," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + menda "fault, blemish," from PIE *mend- "physical defect, fault" (cf. Sanskrit minda "physical blemish," Old Irish mennar "stain, blemish," Welsh mann "sign, mark").

Supplanted in senses of "repair, cure" by its shortened offspring mend (v.). Meaning "to add to legislation" (ostensibly to correct or improve it) is recorded from 1777. Related: Amended; amending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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