wellboned

boned

[bohnd]
adjective
1.
having a particular kind of bone or bony structure (used in combination): beautifully boned; raw-boned; small-boned.
2.
having the bones taken out; cooked or served with the bones removed: boned chicken; boned veal.
3.
braced or supported with stays, as a corset.
4.
fertilized with bone: boned land.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English; see bone, -ed3

well-boned, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bone
O.E. ban "bone, tusk," from P.Gmc. *bainam (cf. O.Fris. ben, O.N. bein, Dan. ben, Ger. Bein). No cognates outside Germanic (the common PIE root is *os-; see osseous); the O.N., Du., and Ger. cognates also mean "shank of the leg," and this is the main meaning in Mod.Ger.,
but English never seems to have had this sense.

bone
Especially in bone up "study," 1880s student slang, probably from "Bohn's Classical Library," a popular series in higher education published by German-born Eng. publisher Henry George Bohn (17961884) as part of a broad series of "libraries" he issued from 1846, totaling 766 volumes, continued after 1864
by G. Bell & Sons.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

bone (bōn)
n.

  1. The dense, semirigid, porous, calcified connective tissue forming the major portion of the skeleton of most vertebrates, consisting of a dense organic matrix and an inorganic, mineral component.

  2. Any of the more than 200 anatomically distinct structures making up the human skeleton.

  3. A piece of bone.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
bone  [%PREMIUM_LINK%]     (bōn)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. The hard, dense, calcified tissue that forms the skeleton of most vertebrates, consisting of a matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral salts. There are two main types of bone structure: compact, which is solid and hard, and cancellous, which is spongy in appearance. Bone serves as a framework for the attachment of muscles and protects vital organs, such as the brain, heart, and lungs. See more at osteoblast, osteocyte.

  2. Any of the structures made of bone that constitute a skeleton, such as the femur. The human skeleton consists of 206 bones.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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