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Westminster, Statutes of

((1275, 1285, 1290), three statutes important in medieval English history, issued in "parliaments" held by Edward I at Westminster. Each comprised a miscellaneous series of clauses designed to amend or clarify extremely diverse aspects of the law, both civil and criminal. The first Statute of Westminster (1275), written in Old French, was issued at Edward's first "general" parliament, to which representatives of the commons had been summoned; the other two statutes were promulgated in parliaments attended only by the great lords and councillors. The second statute (1285) has become known as De donis conditionalibus ("concerning conditional gifts") from its first clause, which sought to restrain alienation of land and preserve entail. The statute (1290) generally referred to by its opening words, Quia emptores terrarum . . . ("because sellers of lands . . ."), called the Third Statute of Westminster by a contemporary chronicler, forbade subinfeudation (the letting out of parcels of land upon feudal tenure) in an attempt to restrict practices that cheated existing lords of their dues. It has been called the first English conveyancing act.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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