wheats

wheat

[hweet, weet]
noun
1.
the grain of any cereal grass of the genus Triticum, especially T. aestivum, used in the form of flour for making bread, cakes, etc., and for other culinary and nutritional purposes.
2.
the plant itself.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English whete, Old English hwǣte; cognate with German Weizen, Old Norse hveiti, Gothic hwaiteis; akin to white

wheatless, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
wheat (wiːt)
 
n
1.  any annual or biennial grass of the genus Triticum, native to the Mediterranean region and W Asia but widely cultivated, having erect flower spikes and light brown grains
2.  the grain of any of these grasses, used in making flour, pasta, etc
 
[Old English hwǣte, related to Old Frisian, Old Saxon hwēti, Old High German hweizi, Old Norse hveiti; see white]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wheat
O.E. hwæte "wheat," from P.Gmc. *khwaitijaz (cf. O.S. hweti, O.N. hveiti, Norw. kveite, O.Fris. hwete, M.Du., Du. weit, O.H.G. weizzi, Ger. Weizen, Goth. hvaiteis "wheat"), lit. "that which is white," from *khwitaz-, the source of O.E. hwit (see white; and cf. Welsh
gwenith "wheat," related to gwenn "white"). The Old World grain was introduced into New Spain in 1528. Wheaties, the cereal brand name, was patented 1925.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Wheat definition


one of the earliest cultivated grains. It bore the Hebrew name _hittah_, and was extensively cultivated in Palestine. There are various species of wheat. That which Pharaoh saw in his dream was the Triticum compositum, which bears several ears upon one stalk (Gen. 41:5). The "fat of the kidneys of wheat" (Deut. 32:14), and the "finest of the wheat" (Ps. 81:16; 147:14), denote the best of the kind. It was exported from Palestine in great quantities (1 Kings 5:11; Ezek. 27:17; Acts 12:20). Parched grains of wheat were used for food in Palestine (Ruth 2:14; 1 Sam. 17:17; 2 Sam. 17:28). The disciples, under the sanction of the Mosaic law (Deut. 23:25), plucked ears of corn, and rubbing them in their hands, ate the grain unroasted (Matt. 12:1; Mark 2:23; Luke 6:1). Before any of the wheat-harvest, however, could be eaten, the first-fruits had to be presented before the Lord (Lev. 23:14).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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