whiplash

whiplash

[hwip-lash, wip-]
noun
1.
the lash of a whip.
2.
an abrupt snapping motion or change of direction resembling the lash of a whip.
3.
Also, whiplash injury. a neck injury caused by a sudden jerking backward, forward, or both, of the head: Whiplash resulted when their car was struck from behind.
4.
Also called whiplash curve. a connected series of reverse curves of more or less elliptical form, used as a major design motif in the art Nouveau style.
verb (used with object)
5.
to beat, hit, throw, etc., with or as if with a whiplash.
6.
to affect adversely, as by a sudden change: new taxes whiplashing corporate earnings.

Origin:
1565–75; 1950–55 for def 6; whip + lash1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To whiplash
Collins
World English Dictionary
whiplash (ˈwɪpˌlæʃ)
 
n
1.  a quick lash or stroke of a whip or like that of a whip
2.  med See whiplash injury

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

whiplash
1573, "the lash of a whip," from whip + lash. The injury caused by sudden head motion so called by 1955, in ref. to the notion of moving to and fro like a cracking whip. The verb in this sense is recorded by 1971.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

whiplash whip·lash (wĭp'lāsh')
n.
Whiplash injury.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

whiplash

injury to the cervical spine and its soft tissues caused by forceful flexion or extension of the neck, especially that occurring during an automobile accident. It may involve sprain, fracture, or dislocation and may vary greatly in location, extent, and degree. Sometimes it is accompanied by concussion. Whiplash is characterized by pain, muscle spasm, and limited motion. Treatment includes protective support for the neck and back and sometimes the attachment of weights to the head or legs to stretch the injured muscles and relieve pressure on nerves.

Learn more about whiplash with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;