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whispered

[hwis-perd, wis-] /ˈʰwɪs pərd, ˈwɪs-/
adjective
1.
rumored; reported:
He is whispered to be planning to run for governor.
Origin
1560-1570
1560-70; whisper + -ed2
Related forms
half-whispered, adjective
quasi-whispered, adjective
unwhispered, adjective

whisper

[hwis-per, wis-per] /ˈʰwɪs pər, ˈwɪs pər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to speak with soft, hushed sounds, using the breath, lips, etc., but with no vibration of the vocal cords.
2.
Phonetics. to produce utterance substituting breath for phonation.
3.
to talk softly and privately (often implying gossip, slander, plotting, or the like):
The king knew that the courtiers were whispering.
4.
(of trees, water, breezes, etc.) to make a soft, rustling sound like that of whispering.
verb (used with object)
5.
to utter with soft, low sounds, using the breath, lips, etc.:
He whispered endearments to her.
6.
Phonetics. to utter (speech sounds) substituting breath for phonation.
7.
to say or tell in a whisper; tell privately.
8.
to speak to or tell (a person) in a whisper or privately.
noun
9.
the mode of utterance, or the voice, of a person who whispers:
to speak in a whisper.
10.
a word or remark uttered by whispering.
11.
a rumor or insinuation:
Whispers circulated about the affair.
12.
a soft, rustling sound like a whisper:
the whisper of leaves in the wind.
Origin
before 950; Middle English whisperen (v.), Old English hwisprian; cognate with German wispern; akin to Old Norse hviskra to whisper, hvīsla to whistle. See whine
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for whispered
  • If the individual fails the whispered voice test, the audiometric test should be administered.
  • Forced whisper test is to first perceive a forced whispered voice, in one ear, at not less than five feet.
  • Hearing works the same way: a vowel is still a vowel whether it's yelled or whispered.
  • But others have whispered that the quality of the university itself has been questioned.
  • Others whispered that he would have been pushed if he had not decided to jump.
  • In the provinces there are whispered claims of state-sanctioned killings.
  • Before sleep sometimes he came and whispered conversation in the old language of the bush.
  • And the production of field-guns, it was whispered, had leaped to six hundred a month.
  • The whispered tales concerning her that had gone about town gave him confidence.
  • When you break up, your secrets get whispered to the world.
British Dictionary definitions for whispered

whisper

/ˈwɪspə/
verb
1.
to speak or utter (something) in a soft hushed tone, esp without vibration of the vocal cords
2.
(intransitive) to speak secretly or furtively, as in promoting intrigue, gossip, etc
3.
(intransitive) (of leaves, trees, etc) to make a low soft rustling sound
4.
(transitive) to utter or suggest secretly or privately to whisper treason
noun
5.
a low soft voice to speak in a whisper
6.
something uttered in such a voice
7.
a low soft rustling sound
8.
a trace or suspicion
9.
(informal) a rumour or secret
Word Origin
Old English hwisprian; related to Old Norse hvīskra, Old High German hwispalōn, Dutch wispern
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for whispered
whisper
O.E. hwisprian "speak very softly" (only in a Northumbrian gloss for L. murmurare), from P.Gmc. *khwis- (cf. M.Du. wispelen, O.H.G. hwispalon, Ger. wispeln, wispern, O.N. hviskra "to whisper"), imitative and probably related to O.E. hwistlian "to whistle." The noun is from 1596.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with whispered
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for whispered

whisper

speech in which the vocal cords are held rigid, preventing the vibration that produces normal sounds. In whispering, voiceless sounds are produced as usual; but voiced sounds (e.g., vowels) are produced by forcing air through a narrow glottal opening formed by holding the vocal cords rigid and close together. See also voice; vocal fry.

Learn more about whisper with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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