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[hwahyt-feys, wahyt-] /ˈʰwaɪtˌfeɪs, ˈwaɪt-/
a Hereford.
  1. a performer, as a clown, who appears in clown white.
  2. the white facial makeup used by such a performer.
Origin of whiteface
1700-10; white + face Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for white-face
Historical Examples
  • You want the white-face girl and you let the man live to please her!

    The Woman from Outside Hulbert Footner
  • I must go after white-face now, or we shall have a late supper.

  • I am going to call upon the small-piece woman whom white-face desires.

    The Daffodil Mystery Edgar Wallace
  • "Uncle Remus," the white-face, always goes through a series of facial contortions with the gravity of a rural judge.

    The Speech of Monkeys R. L. Garner
  • Some exhibitors of Spanish shave the down of the edges of the white-face, in order to make it smooth and larger.

    Poultry Hugh Piper
  • I changed my entire show in the middle of the season, going back to the black-face comedians, white-face singers.

    Watch Yourself Go By Al. G. Field
  • Who's this here tall, white-face feller what comes in with him?

    The Competitive Nephew Montague Glass
  • When I looked around there was one of the white-face, even the Sahib of the tea garden.

    The Sa'-Zada Tales William Alexander Fraser
  • Peter did not fail to tell his red-skinned brothers of the wonderful tidings the white-face missionary at the fort had brought.

    The Trapper's Son W.H.G. Kingston
  • I saw the tents of a white-face last season, after the Rains, and I also took a new yellow bridle to eat.

    The Second Jungle Book Rudyard Kipling
Slang definitions & phrases for white-face



  1. Employed as clerks, office workers, etc: The white collar workers don't strike very often/ As early as the 1920s they were called white-collar slaves and by the 1950s nine-to-fivers
  2. Performed by people who work in offices, esp by managers, high executives, etc: White-collar crime has become a serious problem (1919+)
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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