whole-tone scale

whole-tone scale

[hohl-tohn]
noun Music.
a scale progressing entirely by whole tones, as C, D, E, F♯, G♯, A♯, C.
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whole-tone scale
 
n
either of two scales produced by commencing on one of any two notes a chromatic semitone apart and proceeding upwards or downwards in whole tones for an octave. Such a scale, consisting of six degrees to the octave, is used by Debussy and subsequent composers

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whole-tone scale

in music, a scalar arrangement of pitches, each separated from the next by a whole-tone step (or whole step), in contradistinction to the chromatic scale (consisting entirely of half steps, also called semitones) and the various diatonic scales, such as the major and minor scales (which are different arrangements of whole and half steps).

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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