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wile

[wahyl] /waɪl/
noun
1.
a trick, artifice, or stratagem meant to fool, trap, or entice; device.
2.
wiles, artful or beguiling behavior.
3.
deceitful cunning; trickery.
verb (used with object), wiled, wiling.
4.
to beguile, entice, or lure (usually followed by away, from, into, etc.):
The music wiled him from his study.
Verb phrases
5.
wile away, to spend or pass (time), especially in a leisurely or pleasurable fashion:
to wile away the long winter nights.
Origin
late Old English
1125-1175
1125-75; (noun) Middle English; late Old English wil, perhaps < Old Norse vēl artifice, earlier *wihl-
Related forms
outwile, verb (used with object), outwiled, outwiling.
Can be confused
while, wile.
Synonyms
1, 2. deception, contrivance, maneuver. See trick. 3. chicanery, fraud.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wiles
  • But it also owes something to the sector's entrepreneurial wiles.
  • Securing the portraits required tenacity, quick reflexes and the wiles of a fixer.
  • Perhaps you have experience with percentages and fractions which work their wiles on many a arithmetician.
  • Where there is opportunity for profit, corruption is known to follow and seek opportunity to work its wiles.
British Dictionary definitions for wiles

wile

/waɪl/
noun
1.
trickery, cunning, or craftiness
2.
(usually pl) an artful or seductive trick or ploy
verb
3.
(transitive) to lure, beguile, or entice
Word Origin
C12: from Old Norse vel craft; probably related to Old French wīle, Old English wīgle magic. See guile
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wiles

wile

n.

mid-12c., wil "wile, trick," perhaps from Old North French *wile (Old French guile), or directly from a Scandinavian source (cf. Old Norse vel "trick, craft, fraud," vela "defraud"). Perhaps ultimately related to Old English wicca "wizard" (see Wicca). Lighter sense of "amorous or playful trick" is from c.1600. Wily is attested from c.1300.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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