will garrison

Garrison

[gar-uh-suhn]
noun
William Lloyd, 1805–79, U.S. leader in the abolition movement.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
garrison (ˈɡærɪsən)
 
n
1.  the troops who maintain and guard a base or fortified place
2.  a.  the place itself
 b.  (as modifier): a garrison town
 
vb
3.  (tr) to station (troops) in (a fort)
 
[C13: from Old French garison, from garir to defend, of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse verja to defend, Old English, Old High German werian]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

garrison
c.1300, "store, treasure," from O.Fr. garison "defense," from garir "defend" (see garret). Meaning "fortified stronghold" is from c.1430; that of "body of troops in a fortress" is from 1500.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Garrison definition


(1.) Heb. matstsab, a station; a place where one stands (1 Sam. 14:12); a military or fortified post (1 Sam. 13:23; 14:1, 4, 6, etc.). (2.) Heb. netsib, a prefect, superintendent; hence a military post (1 Sam. 10:5; 13:3, 4; 2 Sam. 8:6). This word has also been explained to denote a pillar set up to mark the Philistine conquest, or an officer appointed to collect taxes; but the idea of a military post seems to be the correct one. (3.) Heb. matstsebah, properly a monumental column; improperly rendered pl. "garrisons" in Ezek. 26:11; correctly in Revised Version "pillars," marg. "obelisks," probably an idolatrous image.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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