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Garrison

[gar-uh-suh n] /ˈgær ə sən/
noun
1.
William Lloyd, 1805–79, U.S. leader in the abolition movement.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for william lloyd garrison
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  • He mentioned having heard william lloyd garrison some years before, and with whom he was well pleased.

    Three Years in Europe William Wells Brown
  • Great in life great also in death was william lloyd garrison.

    William Lloyd Garrison Archibald H. Grimke
  • We have assembled here to-night to celebrate the one hundredth birth of william lloyd garrison.

  • william lloyd garrison was untiring and merciless in flaying the inconsistencies and selfishness of the colonization organization.

  • I shall extract the account of it as given briefly in the lately published life of william lloyd garrison, by his sons.

    Handbook of Home Rule (1887) W. E. Gladstone et al.
  • Like william lloyd garrison, all of them refused to vote, not wishing to take any part in a government which countenanced slavery.

    Susan B. Anthony Alma Lutz
  • His nature led him at once to take the most strenuous and rigorous ground side by side with william lloyd garrison.

    Men of Our Times Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • His generosity and confidence touched her deeply, for already he had become a hero to her second only to william lloyd garrison.

    Susan B. Anthony Alma Lutz
  • Their youngest son, william lloyd garrison, was the celebrated advocate of the abolition of slavery.

    Glimpses of the Past W. O. Raymond
British Dictionary definitions for william lloyd garrison

garrison

/ˈɡærɪsən/
noun
1.
the troops who maintain and guard a base or fortified place
2.
  1. the place itself
  2. (as modifier): a garrison town
verb
3.
(transitive) to station (troops) in (a fort)
Word Origin
C13: from Old French garison, from garir to defend, of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse verja to defend, Old English, Old High German werian
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for william lloyd garrison

garrison

n.

c.1300, "store, treasure," from Old French garison "defense" (Modern French guérison "cure, recovery, healing") from garir "defend" (see garret). Meaning "fortified stronghold" is from early 15c.; that of "body of troops in a fortress" is from mid-15c., a sense taken over from Middle English garnison "body of armed men" (late 14c.), from Old French garnison "provision, munitions," from garnir "to furnish, provide."

v.

1560s, from garrison (n.). Related: Garrisoned; garrisoning.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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william lloyd garrison in the Bible

(1.) Heb. matstsab, a station; a place where one stands (1 Sam. 14:12); a military or fortified post (1 Sam. 13:23; 14:1, 4, 6, etc.). (2.) Heb. netsib, a prefect, superintendent; hence a military post (1 Sam. 10:5; 13:3, 4; 2 Sam. 8:6). This word has also been explained to denote a pillar set up to mark the Philistine conquest, or an officer appointed to collect taxes; but the idea of a military post seems to be the correct one. (3.) Heb. matstsebah, properly a monumental column; improperly rendered pl. "garrisons" in Ezek. 26:11; correctly in Revised Version "pillars," marg. "obelisks," probably an idolatrous image.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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