william, sir

Berkeley

[burk-lee; for 2, 3, 6 also British bahrk-lee]
noun
1.
Busby [buhz-bee] , (William Berkeley Enos) 1895–1976, U.S. choreographer and musical-film director.
2.
George, 1685?–1753, Irish bishop and philosopher.
3.
Sir William, 1610–77, British colonial governor of Virginia 1642–76.
4.
a city in W California, on San Francisco Bay.
5.
a city in E Missouri, near St. Louis.
6.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Blackstone

[blak-stohn; for 1 also blak-stuhn]
noun
1.
Sir William, 1723–80, English jurist and writer on law.
2.
a river in S Massachusetts, flowing SE across NE Rhode Island to Pawtucket. About 40 miles (64 km) long.

Congreve

[kon-greev, kong-]
noun
1.
William, 1670–1729, English dramatist.
2.
Sir William, 1772–1828, English engineer and inventor.

Craigie

[krey-gee]
noun
Sir William (Alexander) 1867–1957, Scottish lexicographer and philologist.

Crookes

[krooks]
noun
Sir William, 1832–1919, English chemist and physicist: discovered the element thallium and the cathode ray.

D'Avenant

[dav-uh-nuhnt]
noun
Sir William, 1606–68, English dramatist and producer: poet laureate 1638–68.
Also, Davenant.

Fox

[foks]
noun
1.
Charles James, 1749–1806, British orator and statesman.
2.
George, 1624–91, English religious leader and writer: founder of the Society of Friends.
3.
John, Foxe, John.
4.
John William, Jr. 1863–1919, U.S. novelist.
5.
Margaret, 1833–93, and her sister Katherine, (“Kate” ), 1839–92, U.S. spiritualist mediums, born in Canada.
6.
Sir William, 1812–93, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister 1856, 1861–62, 1869–72, 1873.

Hamilton

[ham-uhl-tuhn]
noun
1.
Alexander, 1757–1804, American statesman and writer on government: the first Secretary of the Treasury 1789–97; mortally wounded by Aaron Burr in a duel.
2.
Alice, 1869–1970, U.S. physician, educator, and toxicologist.
3.
Edith, 1867–1963, U.S. classical scholar and writer.
4.
Lady Emma (Amy or Emily, Lyon) 1765?–1815, mistress of Viscount Nelson.
5.
Sir Ian Standish Monteith [mon-teeth] , 1853–1947, British general.
6.
Sir William, 1788–1856, Scottish philosopher.
7.
Sir William Rowan [roh-uhn] , 1805–65, Irish mathematician and astronomer.
8.
9.
Also called Grand River. a river flowing E through S Labrador into the Atlantic. 600 miles (965 km).
10.
a mountain of the Coast Range in California, near San Jose: site of Lick Observatory. 4209 feet (1283 meters).
11.
a seaport in SE Ontario, in SE Canada, on Lake Ontario.
12.
a city on central North Island, in New Zealand.
13.
an administrative district in the Strathclyde region, in S Scotland. 50 sq. mi. (130 sq. km).
14.
a city in this district, SE of Glasgow.
15.
a city in SW Ohio.
16.
a seaport in and the capital of Bermuda.
17.
a male given name.

Herschel

[hur-shuhl, hair-]
noun
1.
Sir John Frederick William, 1792–1871, English astronomer.
2.
his father, Sir William (Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel) 1738–1822, English astronomer, born in Germany.
3.
Also, Hershel. a male given name.

Jenner

[jen-er]
noun
1.
Edward, 1749–1823, English physician: discoverer of smallpox vaccine.
2.
Sir William, 1815–98, English physician and pathologist.

Johnson

[jon-suhn; for 3 also Swedish yoon-sawn]
noun
1.
Andrew, 1808–75, seventeenth president of the U.S. 1865–69.
2.
Charles Spurgeon [spur-juhn] , 1893–1956, U.S. educator and sociologist.
3.
Claudia Alta Taylor ("Lady Bird") 1912–2007, U.S. First Lady 1963–69 (wife of Lyndon Johnson).
4.
(Earvin) Magic, Jr, born 1959, U.S. basketball player.
5.
Eyvind [ey-vin] , 1900–76, Swedish writer: Nobel prize 1974.
6.
Gerald White, 1890–1980, U.S. writer.
7.
Howard (Deering) [deer-ing] , 1896?–1972, U.S. businessman: founder of restaurant and motel chain.
8.
Jack (John Arthur) 1878–1946, U.S. heavyweight prizefighter: world champion 1908–15.
9.
James Price, 1891–1955, U.S. pianist and jazz composer.
10.
James Weldon [wel-duhn] , 1871–1938, U.S. poet and essayist.
11.
Lyndon Baines [lin-duhn beynz] , 1908–73, thirty-sixth president of the U.S. 1963–69.
12.
Michael, born 1967, U.S. track athlete.
13.
Philip C(ortelyou) 1906–2005, U.S. architect and author.
14.
Reverdy [rev-er-dee] , 1796–1876, U.S. lawyer and politician: senator 1845–49, 1863–68.
15.
Richard mentor [men-ter, -tawr] , 1780–1850, vice president of the U.S. 1837–41.
16.
Robert, 1911–38, U.S. blues singer and guitarist from the Mississippi Delta.
17.
Samuel ("Dr. Johnson") 1709–84, English lexicographer, critic, poet, and conversationalist.
18.
Thomas, 1732–1819, U.S. politician and Supreme Court justice 1791–93.
19.
Virginia E(shelman) [esh-uhl-muhn] , born 1925, U.S. psychologist: researcher on human sexual behavior (wife of William H. Masters).
20.
Walter Perry ("Big Train") 1887–1946, U.S. baseball player.
21.
Sir William, 1715–74, British colonial administrator in America, born in Ireland.
22.
William Julius ("Judy") 1899–1989, U.S. baseball player, Negro Leagues star.

Jones

[johnz]
noun
1.
Anson [an-suhn] , 1798–1858, president of the Republic of Texas.
2.
Casey [key-see] , (John Luther Jones) 1864–1900, U.S. locomotive engineer: folk hero of ballads, stories, and plays.
3.
Chuck (Charles Martin Jones) 1912–2002, U.S. film animator.
4.
Daniel, 1881–1967, English phonetician.
5.
Ernest, 1879–1958, Welsh psychoanalyst.
6.
(Everett) LeRoi [luh-roi, lee-roi] original name of Imamu Amiri Baraka.
7.
Henry Arthur, 1851–1929, English dramatist.
8.
Howard Mumford [muhm-ferd] , 1892–1980, U.S. educator and critic.
9.
Inigo [in-i-goh] , 1573–1652, English architect.
10.
John Luther ("Casey") 1864–1900, legendary U.S. locomotive engineer, raised in Cayce, Ky.
11.
John Paul (John Paul) 1747–92, American naval commander in the Revolutionary War, born in Scotland.
12.
John Winston [win-stuhn] , 1791–1848, U.S. politician: Speaker of the House 1843–45.
13.
Mary Harris ("Mother Jones") 1830–1930, U.S. labor leader, born in Ireland.
14.
Quincy (Delight) ("Q") born 1933, U.S. jazz musician, film composer and producer.
15.
Robert Edmond, 1887–1954, U.S. set designer.
16.
Robert Tyre [tahyuhr] , ("Bobby") 1902–71, U.S. golfer.
17.
Rufus Matthew, 1863–1948, U.S. Quaker, teacher, author, and humanitarian.
18.
Sir William, 1746–94, English jurist, linguist, and Sanskrit scholar.

Osler

[ohs-ler, ohz-]
noun
Sir William, 1849–1919, Canadian physician and professor of medicine.

Penn

[pen]
noun
1.
Sir William, 1621–70, English admiral.
2.
his son, William, 1644–1718, English Quaker: founder of Pennsylvania 1682.

Ramsay

[ram-zee]
noun
1.
Allan, 1686–1758, Scottish poet.
2.
George, Dalhousie ( def 1 ).
3.
James Andrew Broun, Dalhousie ( def 2 ).
4.
Sir William, 1852–1916, English chemist: Nobel prize 1904.

Siemens

[see-muhnz; German zee-muhns]
noun
1.
(Ernst) Werner von [ernst ver-nuhr fuhn] , 1816–92, German inventor and electrical engineer.
2.
his brother, Sir William (Karl Wilhelm Siemens) 1823–83, English inventor, born in Germany.

Temple

[tem-puhl]
noun
1.
Shirley (Shirley Temple Black) born 1928, U.S. film actress, famous for child roles during the 1930s, and diplomat.
2.
Sir William, 1628–99, English essayist and diplomat.
3.
a city in central Texas.

Thomson

[tom-suhn]
noun
1.
Elihu, 1853–1937, U.S. inventor, born in England.
2.
Sir George Paget, 1892–1975, English physicist (son of Sir Joseph John): Nobel prize 1937.
3.
James, 1700–48, English poet, born in Scotland.
4.
James ("B.V") 1834–82, English poet.
5.
John Arthur, 1861–1933, Scottish scientist and author.
6.
Sir Joseph John, 1856–1940, English physicist: Nobel prize 1906.
7.
Virgil, 1896–1989, U.S. composer and music critic.
8.
Sir William, Kelvin, 1st Baron.

Walays

[wol-is]
noun
Sir William, Wallace, Sir William.

Wallace

[wol-is, waw-lis]
noun
1.
Alfred Russel [ruhs-uhl] , 1823–1913, English naturalist, explorer, and author.
2.
George Corley [kawr-lee] , 1919–98, U.S. politician: governor of Alabama 1963–67, 1971–79, and 1983–87.
3.
Henry (Agard) [ey-gahrd] , 1888–1965, U.S. agriculturalist, author, and statesman: Secretary of Agriculture 1933–40; vice president of the U.S. 1941–45; Secretary of commerce 1945–46.
4.
Lewis ("Lew") 1827–1905, U.S. general and novelist.
5.
Sir William. Also, Walays, Wallensis, 1272?–1305, Scottish military leader and patriot.
6.
(William Roy) DeWitt [duh-wit] , 1889–1981, and his wife, Lila Bell (Acheson), 1889–1984, U.S. magazine publishers.
7.
a male given name: a Scottish family name meaning “Welshman, foreigner.”

Wallensis

[wo-len-sis]
noun
Sir William, Wallace, Sir William.

Walton

[wawl-tn]
noun
1.
Ernest Thomas Sinton [sin-tn] , 1903–95, Irish physicist: Nobel prize 1951.
2.
Izaak [ahy-zuhk] , 1593–1683, English writer.
3.
Samuel Moore ("Sam") 1918–92, U.S. business executive and founder of Wal-Mart Stores.
4.
Sir William (Turner) 1902–83, English composer.

Waltonian [wawl-toh-nee-uhn] , noun, adjective

Watson

[wot-suhn]
noun
1.
James Dewey, born 1928, U.S. biologist: Nobel Prize in medicine 1962.
2.
John ("Ian Maclaren") 1850–1907, Scottish clergyman and novelist.
3.
John Broadus [braw-duhs] , 1878–1958, U.S. psychologist.
4.
John Christian, 1867–1941, Australian statesman, born in Chile: prime minister 1904.
5.
Thomas Augustus, 1854–1934, U.S. electrical experimenter, associated with Alexander Graham Bell.
6.
Thomas John, 1874–1956, U.S. industrialist.
7.
Thomas Sturges [stur-jis] , ("Tom") born 1949, U.S. golfer.
8.
Sir William, 1858–1935, English poet.
9.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Berkeley1 (ˈbɜːklɪ)
 
n
a city in W California, on San Francisco Bay: seat of the University of California. Pop: 102 049 (2003 est)

Berkeley2 (ˈbɑːklɪ)
 
n
1.  Busby. real name William Berkeley Enos. 1895--1976, US dance director, noted esp for his elaborate choreography in film musicals
2.  George. 1685--1753, Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop, whose system of subjective idealism was expounded in his works A Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (1710) and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713). He also wrote Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (1709)
3.  Sir Lennox (Randal Francis). 1903--89, British composer; his works include four symphonies, four operas, and the Serenade for Strings (1939)

Blackstone (ˈblækˌstəʊn, -stən)
 
n
Sir William. 1723--80, English jurist noted particularly for his Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765--69), which had a profound influence on jurisprudence in the US

Congreve (ˈkɒŋɡriːv)
 
n
William. 1670--1729, English dramatist, a major exponent of Restoration comedy; author of Love for Love (1695) and The Way of the World (1700)

Craigie (ˈkreɪɡɪ)
 
n
Sir William A(lexander). 1867--1957, Scottish lexicographer; joint editor of the Oxford English Dictionary (1901--33), and of A Dictionary of American English on Historical Principles (1938--44)

Crookes (krʊks)
 
n
Sir William. 1832--1919, English chemist and physicist: he investigated the properties of cathode rays and invented a type of radiometer and the lens named after him

fox (fɒks)
 
n , pl foxes, fox
1.  any canine mammal of the genus Vulpes and related genera. They are mostly predators that do not hunt in packs and typically have large pointed ears, a pointed muzzle, and a bushy tailRelated: vulpine
2.  the fur of any of these animals, usually reddish-brown or grey in colour
3.  a person who is cunning and sly
4.  slang chiefly (US) a sexually attractive woman
5.  Bible
 a.  a jackal
 b.  an image of a false prophet
6.  nautical small stuff made from yarns twisted together and then tarred
 
vb
7.  (tr) to perplex or confound: to fox a person with a problem
8.  to cause (paper, wood, etc) to become discoloured with spots, or (of paper, etc) to become discoloured, as through mildew
9.  (tr) to trick; deceive
10.  (intr) to act deceitfully or craftily
11.  informal (Austral) (tr) to pursue stealthily; tail
12.  informal (Austral) (tr) to chase and retrieve (a ball)
13.  obsolete (tr) to befuddle with alcoholic drink
 
Related: vulpine
 
[Old English; related to Old High German fuhs, Old Norse fōa fox, Sanskrit puccha tail; see vixen]
 
'foxlike
 
adj

Fox1 (fɒks)
 
n , Fox, Foxes
1.  a member of a North American Indian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
2.  the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family

Fox2 (fɒks)
 
n
1.  Charles James. 1749--1806, British Whig statesman and orator. He opposed North over taxation of the American colonies and Pitt over British intervention against the French Revolution. He advocated parliamentary reform and the abolition of the slave trade
2.  George. 1624--91, English religious leader; founder (1647) of the Society of Friends (Quakers)
3.  Terry, full name Terrance Stanley Fox (1958--81). Canadian athlete: he lost a leg to cancer and subsequently attempted a coast-to-coast run across Canada to raise funds for cancer research
4.  Vicente (Spanish viˈθɛnte). born 1942, Mexican politician; president of Mexico (2000-06)
5.  Sir William. 1812--93, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1856; 1861--62; 1869--72; 1873)

Hamilton1 (ˈhæməltən)
 
n
1.  a port in central Canada, in S Ontario on Lake Ontario: iron and steel industry. Pop: 618 820 (2001)
2.  a city in New Zealand, on central North Island. Pop: 129 300 (2004 est)
3.  a town in S Scotland, in South Lanarkshire near Glasgow. Pop: 48 546 (2001)
4.  the capital and chief port of Bermuda. Pop: 3461 (2000)
5.  the former name of Churchill

Hamilton2 (ˈhæməltən)
 
n
1.  Alexander. ?1757--1804, American statesman. He was a leader of the Federalists and as first secretary of the Treasury (1789--95) established a federal bank
2.  Lady Emma. ?1765--1815, mistress of Nelson
3.  James, 1st Duke of Hamilton. 1606--49, Scottish supporter of Charles I in the English Civil War: defeated by Cromwell at the Battle of Preston and executed
4.  Lewis Carl. born 1985, English formula 1 racing driver
5.  Richard. born 1922, British artist: a pioneer of the pop art style
6.  Sir William Rowan. 1805--65, Irish mathematician: founded Hamiltonian mechanics and formulated the theory of quaternions

Herschel (ˈhɜːʃəl)
 
n
1.  Caroline Lucretia. 1750--1848, British astronomer, born in Germany, noted for her catalogue of nebulae and star clusters: sister of Sir William Herschel
2.  Sir John Frederick William. 1792--1871, British astronomer. He discovered and catalogued over 525 nebulae and star clusters
3.  his father, Sir (Frederick) William, original name Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel. 1738--1822, British astronomer, born in Germany. He constructed a reflecting telescope, which led to his discovery of the planet Uranus (1781), two of its satellites, and two of the satellites of Saturn. He also discovered the motions of binary stars

Jenner (ˈdʒɛnə)
 
n
1.  Edward 1749--1823, English physician, who discovered vaccination by showing that injections of cowpox virus produce immunity against smallpox (1796)
2.  Sir William. 1815--98, English physician and pathologist, who differentiated between typhus and typhoid fevers (1849)

Johnson (ˈdʒɒnsən)
 
n
1.  Amy 1903--41, British aviator, who made several record flights, including those to Australia (1930) and to Cape Town and back (1936)
2.  Andrew 1808--75, US Democrat statesman who was elected vice president under the Republican Abraham Lincoln; 17th president of the US (1865--69), became president after Lincoln's assassination. His lenience towards the South after the American Civil War led to strong opposition from radical Republicans, who tried to impeach him
3.  Earvin (ˈɜːvɪn), known as Magic. born 1959, US basketball player
4.  Eyvind (ˈevɪnt). 1900--76, Swedish novelist and writer, whose novels include the Krilon trilogy (1941--43): joint winner of the Nobel prize for literature 1974
5.  Jack 1878--1946, US boxer; world heavyweight champion (1908--15)
6.  Lionel (Pigot) 1867--1902, British poet and critic, best known for his poems "Dark Angel" and "By the Statue of King Charles at Charing Cross"
7.  Lyndon Baines known as LBJ. 1908--73, US Democrat statesman; 36th president of the US (1963--69). His administration carried the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965, but he lost popularity by increasing US involvement in the Vietnam war
8.  Martin. born 1970, English Rugby Union footballer; captain of the England team that won the World Cup in 2003.
9.  Michael (Duane) born 1967, US athlete: world (1995) and Olympic (1996) 200- and 400-metre gold medallist
10.  Philip (Cortelyou). 1906--2005, US architect and writer; his buildings include the New York State Theater (1964) and the American Telephone and Telegraph building (1978--83), both in New York
11.  Robert ?1898--1937, US blues singer and guitarist
12.  Samuel known as Dr. Johnson. 1709--84, British lexicographer, critic, and conversationalist, whose greatest works are his Dictionary (1755), his edition of Shakespeare (1765), and his Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets (1779--81). His fame, however, rests as much on Boswell's biography of him as on his literary output

Jones (dʒəʊnz)
 
n
1.  Daniel. 1881--1967, British phonetician
2.  Daniel. 1912--93, Welsh composer. He wrote nine symphonies and much chamber music
3.  David. 1895--1974, British artist and writer: his literary works, which combine poetry and prose, include In Parenthesis (1937), an account of World War I, and The Anathemata (1952)
4.  Digby (Marritt). born 1956, British businessman; director-general of the Confederation of British Industry (2000--06)
5.  Inigo (ˈɪnɪɡəʊ). 1573--1652, English architect and theatrical designer, who introduced Palladianism to England. His buildings include the Banqueting Hall of Whitehall. He also designed the settings for court masques, being the first to use the proscenium arch and movable scenery in England
6.  John Paul, original name John Paul. 1747--92, US naval commander, born in Scotland: noted for his part in the War of American Independence
7.  (Everett) Le Roi (ˈliːrɔɪ), Muslim name Imanu Amìri Baraka. born 1934, US Black poet, dramatist, and political figure
8.  Quincy. born 1933, US composer, arranger, conductor, record producer, and trumpeter, noted esp for his film scores
9.  Robert Tyre, known as Bobby Jones. 1902--71, US golfer

Osler (ˈɒzlə)
 
n
Sir William. 1849--1919, Canadian physician, pioneer of residency in medical training

Penn (pɛn)
 
n
1.  Irving. born 1917, US photographer, noted for his portraits and his innovations in colour photography
2.  William. 1644--1718, English Quaker and founder of Pennsylvania

Ramsay (ˈræmzɪ)
 
n
1.  Allan. ?1686--1758, Scottish poet, editor, and bookseller, noted particularly for his pastoral comedy The Gentle Shepherd (1725): first person to introduce the circulating library in Scotland
2.  his son, Allan 1713--84, Scottish portrait painter
3.  James Andrew Broun Ramsay See Dalhousie
4.  Gordon. born 1963, British chef and restaurateur; achieved a third Michelin star (2001)
5.  Sir William. 1852--1916, Scottish chemist. He discovered argon (1894) with Rayleigh, isolated helium (1895), and identified neon, krypton, and xenon: Nobel prize for chemistry 1904

siemens (ˈsiːmənz)
 
n , pl siemens
S, Formerly called: mho the derived SI unit of electrical conductance equal to 1 reciprocal ohm

Siemens (ˈsiːmənz)
 
n
1.  Ernst Werner von (ɛrnst ˈvɛrnər fɔn). 1816--92, German engineer, inventor, and pioneer in telegraphy. Among his inventions are the self-excited dynamo and an electrolytic refining process
2.  his brother, Sir William, original name Karl Wilhelm Siemens. 1823--83, British engineer, born in Germany, who invented the open-hearth process for making steel

temple1 (ˈtɛmpəl)
 
n
1.  a building or place dedicated to the worship of a deity or deities
2.  a Mormon church
3.  (US) another name for a synagogue
4.  any Christian church, esp a large or imposing one
5.  any place or object regarded as a shrine where God makes himself present, esp the body of a person who has been sanctified or saved by grace
6.  a building regarded as the focus of an activity, interest, or practice: a temple of the arts
 
[Old English tempel, from Latin templum; probably related to Latin tempustime, Greek temenos sacred enclosure, literally: a place cut off, from temnein to cut]
 
'templed1
 
adj
 
'temple-like1
 
adj

temple2 (ˈtɛmpəl)
 
n
the region on each side of the head in front of the ear and above the cheek boneRelated: temporal
 
Related: temporal
 
[C14: from Old French temple, from Latin tempora the temples, from tempus temple of the head]

temple3 (ˈtɛmpəl)
 
n
the part of a loom that keeps the cloth being woven stretched to the correct width
 
[C15: from French, from Latin templum a small timber]

Temple1 (ˈtɛmpəl)
 
n
1.  either of two buildings in London and Paris that belonged to the Templars. The one in London now houses two of the chief law societies
2.  any of three buildings or groups of buildings erected by the Jews in ancient Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah

Temple2 (ˈtɛmpəl)
 
n
1.  Shirley, married name Shirley Temple Black. born 1928, US film actress and politician. Her films as a child star include Little Miss Marker (1934), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and Heidi (1937). She was US ambassador to Ghana (1974-- 76) and to Czechoslovakia (1989--92)
2.  Sir William. 1628--99, English diplomat and essayist. He negotiated the Triple Alliance (1668) and the marriage of William of Orange to Mary II
3.  William. 1881--1944, English prelate and advocate of social reform; archbishop of Canterbury (1942--44)

Thomson (ˈtɒmsən)
 
n
1.  Sir George Paget, son of Joseph John Thomson. 1892--1975, British physicist, who discovered (1927) the diffraction of electrons by crystals: shared the Nobel prize for physics 1937
2.  James. 1700--48, Scottish poet. He anticipated the romantics' feeling for nature in The Seasons (1726--30)
3.  James, pen name B.V. 1834--82, British poet, born in Scotland, noted esp for The City of Dreadful Night (1874), reflecting man's isolation and despair
4.  Sir Joseph John. 1856--1940, British physicist. He discovered the electron (1897) and his work on the nature of positive rays led to the discovery of isotopes: Nobel prize for physics 1906
5.  Roy, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet. 1894--1976, British newspaper proprietor, born in Canada
6.  Virgil. 1896--1989, US composer, music critic, and conductor, whose works include two operas, Four Saints in Three Acts (1928) and The Mother of Us All (1947), piano sonatas, a cello concerto, songs, and film music
7.  Sir William. See (1st Baron) Kelvin

Wallace (ˈwɒlɪs)
 
n
1.  Alfred Russel. 1823--1913, British naturalist, whose work on the theory of natural selection influenced Charles Darwin
2.  Edgar. 1875--1932, English crime novelist
3.  Sir Richard. 1818--90, English art collector and philanthropist. His bequest to the nation forms the Wallace Collection, London
4.  Sir William. ?1272--1305, Scottish patriot, who defeated the army of Edward I of England at Stirling (1297) but was routed at Falkirk (1298) and later executed

Walton (ˈwɔːltən)
 
n
1.  Ernest Thomas Sinton. 1903--95, Irish physicist. He succeeded in producing the first artificial transmutation of an atomic nucleus (1932) with Sir John Cockcroft, with whom he shared the Nobel prize for physics 1951
2.  Izaak (ˈaɪzək). 1593--1683, English writer, best known for The Compleat Angler (1653; enlarged 1676)
3.  Sir William (Turner). 1902--83, English composer. His works include Façade (1923), a setting of satirical verses by Edith Sitwell, the Viola Concerto (1929), and the oratorio Belshazzar's Feast (1931)

Watson (ˈwɒtsən)
 
n
1.  James Dewey. born 1928, US biologist, whose contribution to the discovery of the helical structure of DNA won him a Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine shared with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins in 1962
2.  John B(roadus). 1878--1958, US psychologist; a leading exponent of behaviourism
3.  John Christian. 1867--1941, Australian statesman, born in Chile: prime minister of Australia (1904)
4.  Russell. born 1973, British tenor, maker of the bestselling albums The Voice (2001) and Encore (2002)
5.  Tom, full name Thomas Sturges Watson. born 1949, US golfer: won the US Open Championship (1982), the British Open Championship (1975, 1977, 1980, 1982, 1983), and the World Series (1975, 1977, 1980)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

johnson
"penis," 1863, perhaps related to British slang John Thomas, which has the same meaning (1887).

Jones
for the surname, see John. Phrase keep up with the Joneses (1913, Amer.Eng.) is from the title of a comic strip by Arthur R. Momand. The slang sense "intense desire, addiction" (1968) probably arose from earlier use of Jones as a synonym for "heroin," presumably from the proper name, but the connection,
if any, is obscure.

temple
"building for worship," O.E. tempel, from L. templum "piece of ground consecrated for the taking of auspices, building for worship," of uncertain signification. Commonly referred either to PIE base *tem- "to cut," on notion of "place reserved or cut out," or to PIE base *temp- "to stretch," on notion
of cleared space in front of an altar. Fig. sense of "any place regarded as occupied by divine presence" was in O.E. Applied to Jewish synagogues from 1598.

temple
"side of the forehead," c.1310, from O.Fr. temple "side of the forehead" (11c.), from V.L. *tempula (fem. sing.), from L. tempora, pl. of tempus (gen. temporis) "side of the forehead," probably originally "the thin stretch of skin at the side of the forehead." Possibly associated with tempus span "timely
space (for a mortal blow with a sword)," or from the notion of "stretched, thinnest part," which is the sense of cognate O.E. ðunwange, lit. "thin cheek."

fox
O.E. fox, from W.Gmc. *fukhs (cf. O.H.G. fuhs, O.N. foa, Goth. fauho), from P.Gmc. base *fuh-, corresponding to PIE *puk- "tail" (cf. Skt. puccha- "tail"). The bushy tail is also the source of words for "fox" in Welsh (llwynog, from llwyn "bush"); Sp. (raposa, from rabo "tail"); Lith. (uodegis "fox,"
from uodega "tail"). Metaphoric extension to "clever person" is early 13c. The verb is from 1560s. Meaning "sexually attractive woman" is from 1940s; but foxy in this sense is recorded from 1895. Foxed in booksellers' catalogues means "stained with fox-colored marks."

Fox
Algonquian people, transl. Fr. renards, which itself may be a transl. of an Iroquoian term meaning "red fox people." Their name for themselves is /mekwahki:-haki/ "red earths."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Hamilton Ham·il·ton (hām'əl-tən), Alice. 1869-1970.

American toxicologist and physician known for her research on occupational poisons and her book Industrial Poisons in the United States (1925).

Jenner Jen·ner (jěn'ər), Edward. 1749-1823.

British physician and vaccination pioneer who found that smallpox could be prevented by inoculation with the substance from cowpox lesions.

jones (jōnz)
n.

  1. Heroin.

  2. An addiction, especially to heroin.

siemens sie·mens (sē'mənz)
n. pl. siemens
A unit of electrical conductance in the International System of Units, equal to one ampere per volt.

temple tem·ple (těm'pəl)
n.

  1. The flat region on either side of the forehead.

  2. Either of the sidepieces of a frame for eyeglasses that extends along the temple and over the ear.

Wallace Wal·lace (wŏl'ĭs), Alfred Russel. 1823-1913.

British naturalist who developed a concept of evolution that paralleled the work of Charles Darwin.

Watson Wat·son (wŏt'sən), James Dewey. Born 1928.

American biologist who with Francis Crick proposed a spiral model, the double helix, for the molecular structure of DNA. He shared a 1962 Nobel Prize for advances in the study of genetics.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Crookes   (krks)  Pronunciation Key 
British chemist and physicist who discovered thallium in 1861 and invented the radiometer (1873-76). He also developed the Crookes tube, a modified vacuum tube that was later used by W.C. Roentgen and J.J. Thomson in experiments that led to the discovery of x-rays and the electron, respectively.
Herschel   (hûr'shəl)  Pronunciation Key 
Family of British astronomers led by Sir William Herschel (1738-1822), who discovered Uranus (1781) and cataloged more than 800 binary stars and 2,500 nebulae. His sister Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) discovered eight comets and several nebulae and star clusters, and published at least two astronomical catalogs which are still currently used. His son Sir John Frederick William Herschel (1792-1871) discovered 525 nebulae and pioneered celestial photography.

Our Living Language  : Brother and sister William Herschel and Caroline Herschel began their professional careers as musicians. Born in Germany, they moved to England, where Caroline became a soprano soloist in performances conducted by her brother. William's background in music spurred him to study mathematics and astronomy, which he then taught his sister, and they each went on to produce a string of important scientific discoveries. William was the first astronomer to study binary stars and, while searching for comets in 1781, he discovered Uranus, the first new planet to be discovered since ancient times. He also discovered two satellites of Uranus (Titania and Oberon, 1787), and two of Saturn (Mimas and Enceladus, 1789-90). Caroline observed her first comet in 1786 and eventually discovered seven others, as well as nebulae and star clusters. King George III appointed William his Astronomer Royal in 1787, and Caroline was made assistant astronomer. After William's death, Caroline returned to Germany and published a catalog of 2,500 nebulae, for which the (British) Royal Astronomical Society awarded her its gold medal in 1828.
Jenner   (jěn'ər)  Pronunciation Key 
British physician who pioneered the practice of vaccination. His experiments proved that individuals who had been inoculated with the virus that caused cowpox, a mild skin disease of cattle, became immune to smallpox. Jenner's discovery laid the foundations for the science of immunology.

Our Living Language  : In 1980 the World Health organization declared that the deadly disease smallpox had been eradicated, an accomplishment attributed to the success of the smallpox vaccine. The vaccine had been developed almost 200 years earlier by the British physician Edward Jenner, who had based his work on a piece of folk wisdom from the countryside that few doctors had taken seriously: people who caught cowpox, a mild viral infection of cattle, never got smallpox. In 1796 Jenner proved the truth of this scientifically in a famous experiment he conducted on an eight-year-old boy named James Phipps. Jenner exposed Phipps to a person with cowpox, then two months later exposed him to smallpox (this would be considered unethical by today's standards). As Jenner expected, the boy warded off the smallpox without any complications. Prior to this, there existed a form of vaccination against smallpox that consisted of exposing people to a mild form of the disease. Although this method often worked, it was risky, and the exposed person sometimes died. Jenner, who devised the word vaccination from the Latin vacca, for "cow," is considered to be the father of immunology. He also did significant research on heart disease.
Ramsay   (rām'zē)  Pronunciation Key 
British chemist who discovered the noble gases argon (with Lord Rayleigh), helium, neon, xenon, and krypton. For this work he was awarded the 1904 Nobel Prize for chemistry. In 1908 his research showed that radon was also a noble gas.
siemens   (sē'mənz)  Pronunciation Key 
Plural siemens
See mho.
Thomson   (tŏm'sən)  Pronunciation Key 
British physicist who discovered the electron in 1897. While experimenting with cathode rays, he deduced that the particles he observed were smaller than an atom. Thomson also made noteworthy studies of the conduction of electricity through gases. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906.

Our Living Language  : Nowadays we take for granted the existence of electrons, but this was not true just over 100 years ago, when the atom was thought to be a single unit that had no parts. The breakthroughs came in the late 1890s, when the British physicist J. J. Thomson was studying what we now call cathode-ray tubes. As an electric current passed from the cathode at one end of the tube to the anode at the other, raylike emanations were seen to proceed from the cathode to the anode. Thomson examined the nature of the rays' charge by bringing a positively charged and a negatively charged plate near the path of the rays, and observed that the rays were deflected toward the positive plate, suggesting they had negative charge. A series of experiments in which various objects were placed in the path of the rays showed that they also had momentum (they would cause a small paddle wheel to turn, for example). If they had momentum, that meant (in the physics of the time) that they had mass, suggesting that the rays were composed of tiny particles. Other experimental results, some by other scientists, suggested that the ratio of the charge to the mass of these particles had to be less than one-thousandth the ratio for charged hydrogen atoms. By examining both the energy of the rays and the amount by which an electric charge deflected them, Thomson was able to calculate that these particles had one two-thousandth the mass of a hydrogen atom. The particles, first named corpuscles, were later called electrons. (The term electron was not completely new; it had been invented in 1891 for the rays themselves.) Thomson was thus the first to discover that particles smaller than atoms existed, and for his pioneering work he was awarded the 1906 Nobel Prize for physics.
Wallace   (wŏl'ĭs)  Pronunciation Key 
British naturalist who formulated a theory of evolution by natural selection independently of Charles Darwin. Wallace spent eight years (1854-62) traveling in Malaysia and assembling evidence for his theories, which he sent to Darwin in England. Their findings were first presented to the public in 1858.
Walton   (wôl'tən)  Pronunciation Key 
Irish physicist who, with John Cockcroft, was the first to successfully split an atom using a particle accelerator in 1932. For this work they shared the 1951 Nobel Prize for physics.
Watson   (wŏt'sən)  Pronunciation Key 
American biologist who, working with Francis Crick, identified the structure of DNA in 1953. By analyzing the patterns cast by x-rays striking DNA molecules, they discovered that DNA has the structure of a double helix, two spirals linked together by bases in ladderlike rungs. For this work Watson and Crick shared with Maurice Wilkins the 1962 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

Temple definition


The central place of worship for the Israelites. The first Temple was built in Jerusalem by King Solomon. The stone tablets received by Moses on Mount Sinai — tablets on which the Ten Commandments were written — were kept in the central chamber of Solomon's Temple. Solomon's Temple was later destroyed, as were two succeeding temples built on the site.

Note: A wall remaining from the temples, known as the Western Wall, is one of the most sacred places for Jews today.

Berkeley definition


City in California on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay.

Note: Berkeley is the location of a distinguished branch of the University of California. The University of California at Berkeley has been a center for student activism and social-change movements, particularly in the 1960s and early 1970s.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Fox definition


(Heb. shu'al, a name derived from its digging or burrowing under ground), the Vulpes thaleb, or Syrian fox, the only species of this animal indigenous to Palestine. It burrows, is silent and solitary in its habits, is destructive to vineyards, being a plunderer of ripe grapes (Cant. 2:15). The Vulpes Niloticus, or Egyptian dog-fox, and the Vulpes vulgaris, or common fox, are also found in Palestine. The proverbial cunning of the fox is alluded to in Ezek. 13:4, and in Luke 13:32, where our Lord calls Herod "that fox." In Judg. 15:4, 5, the reference is in all probability to the jackal. The Hebrew word _shu'al_ through the Persian _schagal_ becomes our jackal (Canis aureus), so that the word may bear that signification here. The reasons for preferring the rendering "jackal" are (1) that it is more easily caught than the fox; (2) that the fox is shy and suspicious, and flies mankind, while the jackal does not; and (3) that foxes are difficult, jackals comparatively easy, to treat in the way here described. Jackals hunt in large numbers, and are still very numerous in Southern Palestine.

Temple definition


first used of the tabernacle, which is called "the temple of the Lord" (1 Sam. 1:9). In the New Testament the word is used figuratively of Christ's human body (John 2:19, 21). Believers are called "the temple of God" (1 Cor. 3:16, 17). The Church is designated "an holy temple in the Lord" (Eph. 2:21). Heaven is also called a temple (Rev. 7:5). We read also of the heathen "temple of the great goddess Diana" (Acts 19:27). This word is generally used in Scripture of the sacred house erected on the summit of Mount Moriah for the worship of God. It is called "the temple" (1 Kings 6:17); "the temple [R.V., 'house'] of the Lord" (2 Kings 11:10); "thy holy temple" (Ps. 79:1); "the house of the Lord" (2 Chr. 23:5, 12); "the house of the God of Jacob" (Isa. 2:3); "the house of my glory" (60:7); an "house of prayer" (56:7; Matt. 21:13); "an house of sacrifice" (2 Chr. 7:12); "the house of their sanctuary" (2 Chr. 36:17); "the mountain of the Lord's house" (Isa. 2:2); "our holy and our beautiful house" (64:11); "the holy mount" (27:13); "the palace for the Lord God" (1 Chr. 29:1); "the tabernacle of witness" (2 Chr. 24:6); "Zion" (Ps. 74:2; 84:7). Christ calls it "my Father's house" (John 2:16).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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