wilt dis-ease

wilt

1 [wilt]
verb (used without object)
1.
to become limp and drooping, as a fading flower; wither.
2.
to lose strength, vigor, assurance, etc.: to wilt after a day's hard work.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cause to wilt.
noun Also, wilt disease (for defs 5b, 6).
4.
the act of wilting, or the state of being wilted: a sudden wilt of interest in the discussion.
5.
Plant Pathology.
a.
the drying out, drooping, and withering of the leaves of a plant due to inadequate water supply, excessive transpiration, or vascular disease.
b.
a disease so characterized, as fusarium wilt.
6.
a virus disease of various caterpillars, characterized by the liquefaction of body tissues.

Origin:
1685–95; dialectal variant of wilk to wither, itself variant of welk, Middle English welken, probably < Middle Dutch welken; compare German welk withered


2. wane, droop; ebb, weaken.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wilt1 (wɪlt)
 
vb
1.  to become or cause to become limp, flaccid, or drooping: insufficient water makes plants wilt
2.  to lose or cause to lose courage, strength, etc
3.  (tr) to cook (a leafy vegetable) very briefly until it begins to collapse
 
n
4.  the act of wilting or state of becoming wilted
5.  any of various plant diseases characterized by permanent wilting, usually caused by fungal parasites attacking the roots
 
[C17: perhaps variant of wilk to wither, from Middle Dutch welken]

wilt2 (wɪlt)
 
vb (used with the pronoun thou or its relative equivalent)
archaic, dialect or a singular form of the present tense (indicative mood) of will

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wilt
1691, probably an alteration of welk "to wilt," probably from M.Du. or M.L.G. welken "to wither," cognate with O.H.G. irwelhen "become soft."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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