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wine

[wahyn] /waɪn/
noun
1.
the fermented juice of grapes, made in many varieties, such as red, white, sweet, dry, still, and sparkling, for use as a beverage, in cooking, in religious rites, etc., and usually having an alcoholic content of 14 percent or less.
2.
a particular variety of such fermented grape juice:
port and sherry wines.
3.
the juice, fermented or unfermented, of various other fruits or plants, used as a beverage, sauce, etc.:
gooseberry wine; currant wine.
4.
a dark reddish color, as of red wines.
5.
Pharmacology, vinum.
6.
something that invigorates, cheers, or intoxicates like wine.
7.
British.
  1. a social gathering at which wine is the major beverage.
  2. a party, especially one held by university students, for drinking wine.
8.
Obsolete. intoxication due to the drinking of wine.
adjective
9.
dark red in color.
verb (used with object), wined, wining.
10.
to supply with wine:
He wined his cellar with rare vintages.
verb (used without object), wined, wining.
11.
to drink wine.
Idioms
12.
new wine in old bottles, something new placed in or superimposed on an old or existing form, system, etc. Matt. 9:17.
13.
wine and dine, to entertain lavishly:
They wined and dined us in order to get us to sign the new contract.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English (noun), Old English wīn (cognate with Dutch wijn, German Wein, Old Norse vīn, Gothic wein) ≪ Latin vīnum (cognate with Greek oînos)
Related forms
wineless, adjective
winish, adjective
Can be confused
wine, whine.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wine
  • wine in a box makes sense environmentally and economically.
  • wine may be as old or older than beer-though no one can be certain.
  • New research provides additional incentive to do that with red wine.
  • And chatting with friends at a wine garden is not a special event but a way of life.
  • If you want to store more than one bottle of wine at a time though, better start breaking ground on that wine cellar.
  • He was unaware that students had brought wine to the gathering.
  • Moreover, the state is the biggest vineyard owner and benefits from taxes on wine sales.
  • Dark, secluded wine cellar, north of the city center.
  • Archaeologists and physicists worked together to uncover historical information on an ancient wine vessel.
  • They posed as priests and rabbis to acquire sacramental wine.
British Dictionary definitions for wine

wine

/waɪn/
noun
1.
  1. an alcoholic drink produced by the fermenting of grapes with water and sugar related adjectives vinaceous vinous
  2. an alcoholic drink produced in this way from other fruits, flowers, etc: elderberry wine
2.
  1. a dark red colour, sometimes with a purplish tinge
  2. (as adjective): wine-coloured
3.
anything resembling wine in its intoxicating or invigorating effect
4.
(pharmacol, obsolete) fermented grape juice containing medicaments
5.
(Brit) Adam's wine, a dialect word for water
6.
new wine in old bottles, something new added to or imposed upon an old or established order
verb
7.
(intransitive) to drink wine
8.
wine and dine, to entertain or be entertained with wine and fine food
Derived Forms
wineless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English wīn, from Latin vīnum; related to Greek oinos, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wine
n.

Old English win, from Proto-Germanic *winam (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old High German win, Old Norse vin, Dutch wijn, German Wein), an early borrowing from Latin vinum "wine," from PIE *win-o-, from an Italic noun related to words for "wine" in Greek (oinos), Armenian, Hittite, and non-Indo-European Georgian and West Semitic (cf. Arabic wain, Hebrew yayin), probably from a lost Mediterranean language word *win-/*woin- "wine." Also from Latin vinum are Old Church Slavonic vino, Lithuanian vynas, Welsh gwin, Old Irish fin. Essentially the same word as vine (q.v.). Wine snob is recorded from 1951.

v.

"entertain with wine," 1862, from wine (n.). Related: Wined; wining.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for wine

windy

adjective

Given to talking too much; overly garrulous, esp pompously so: It's another one of his windy orations (1513+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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wine in the Bible

The common Hebrew word for wine is _yayin_, from a root meaning "to boil up," "to be in a ferment." Others derive it from a root meaning "to tread out," and hence the juice of the grape trodden out. The Greek word for wine is _oinos_, and the Latin _vinun_. But besides this common Hebrew word, there are several others which are thus rendered. (1.) Ashishah (2 Sam. 6:19; 1 Chr. 16:3; Cant. 2:5; Hos. 3:1), which, however, rather denotes a solid cake of pressed grapes, or, as in the Revised Version, a cake of raisins. (2.) 'Asis, "sweet wine," or "new wine," the product of the same year (Cant. 8:2; Isa. 49:26; Joel 1:5; 3:18; Amos 9:13), from a root meaning "to tread," hence juice trodden out or pressed out, thus referring to the method by which the juice is obtained. The power of intoxication is ascribed to it. (3.) Hometz. See VINEGAR. (4.) Hemer, Deut. 32:14 (rendered "blood of the grape") Isa. 27:2 ("red wine"), Ezra 6:9; 7:22; Dan. 5:1, 2, 4. This word conveys the idea of "foaming," as in the process of fermentation, or when poured out. It is derived from the root _hamar_, meaning "to boil up," and also "to be red," from the idea of boiling or becoming inflamed. (5.) 'Enabh, a grape (Deut. 32:14). The last clause of this verse should be rendered as in the Revised Version, "and of the blood of the grape ['enabh] thou drankest wine [hemer]." In Hos. 3:1 the phrase in Authorized Version, "flagons of wine," is in the Revised Version correctly "cakes of raisins." (Comp. Gen. 49:11; Num. 6:3; Deut. 23:24, etc., where this Hebrew word is rendered in the plural "grapes.") (6.) Mesekh, properly a mixture of wine and water with spices that increase its stimulating properties (Isa. 5:22). Ps. 75:8, "The wine [yayin] is red; it is full of mixture [mesekh];" Prov. 23:30, "mixed wine;" Isa. 65:11, "drink offering" (R.V., "mingled wine"). (7.) Tirosh, properly "must," translated "wine" (Deut. 28:51); "new wine" (Prov. 3:10); "sweet wine" (Micah 6:15; R.V., "vintage"). This Hebrew word has been traced to a root meaning "to take possession of" and hence it is supposed that tirosh is so designated because in intoxicating it takes possession of the brain. Among the blessings promised to Esau (Gen. 27:28) mention is made of "plenty of corn and tirosh." Palestine is called "a land of corn and tirosh" (Deut. 33:28; comp. Isa. 36:17). See also Deut. 28:51; 2 Chr. 32:28; Joel 2:19; Hos. 4:11, ("wine [yayin] and new wine [tirosh] take away the heart"). (8.) Sobhe (root meaning "to drink to excess," "to suck up," "absorb"), found only in Isa. 1:22, Hos. 4:18 ("their drink;" Gesen. and marg. of R.V., "their carouse"), and Nah. 1:10 ("drunken as drunkards;" lit., "soaked according to their drink;" R.V., "drenched, as it were, in their drink", i.e., according to their sobhe). (9.) Shekar, "strong drink," any intoxicating liquor; from a root meaning "to drink deeply," "to be drunken", a generic term applied to all fermented liquors, however obtained. Num. 28:7, "strong wine" (R.V., "strong drink"). It is sometimes distinguished from wine, c.g., Lev. 10:9, "Do not drink wine [yayin] nor strong drink [shekar];" Num. 6:3; Judg. 13:4, 7; Isa. 28:7 (in all these places rendered "strong drink"). Translated "strong drink" also in Isa. 5:11; 24:9; 29:9; 56:12; Prov. 20:1; 31:6; Micah 2:11. (10.) Yekebh (Deut. 16:13, but in R.V. correctly "wine-press"), a vat into which the new wine flowed from the press. Joel 2:24, "their vats;" 3:13, "the fats;" Prov. 3:10, "Thy presses shall burst out with new wine [tirosh];" Hag. 2:16; Jer. 48:33, "wine-presses;" 2 Kings 6:27; Job. 24:11. (11.) Shemarim (only in plural), "lees" or "dregs" of wine. In Isa. 25:6 it is rendered "wines on the lees", i.e., wine that has been kept on the lees, and therefore old wine. (12.) Mesek, "a mixture," mixed or spiced wine, not diluted with water, but mixed with drugs and spices to increase its strength, or, as some think, mingled with the lees by being shaken (Ps. 75:8; Prov. 23:30). In Acts 2:13 the word _gleukos_, rendered "new wine," denotes properly "sweet wine." It must have been intoxicating. In addition to wine the Hebrews also made use of what they called _debash_, which was obtained by boiling down must to one-half or one-third of its original bulk. In Gen. 43:11 this word is rendered "honey." It was a kind of syrup, and is called by the Arabs at the present day dibs. This word occurs in the phrase "a land flowing with milk and honey" (debash), Ex. 3:8, 17; 13:5; 33:3; Lev. 20:24; Num. 13: 27. (See HONEY.) Our Lord miraculously supplied wine at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee (John 2:1-11). The Rechabites were forbidden the use of wine (Jer. 35). The Nazarites also were to abstain from its use during the period of their vow (Num. 6:1-4); and those who were dedicated as Nazarites from their birth were perpetually to abstain from it (Judg. 13:4, 5; Luke 1:15; 7:33). The priests, too, were forbidden the use of wine and strong drink when engaged in their sacred functions (Lev. 10:1, 9-11). "Wine is little used now in the East, from the fact that Mohammedans are not allowed to taste it, and very few of other creeds touch it. When it is drunk, water is generally mixed with it, and this was the custom in the days of Christ also. The people indeed are everywhere very sober in hot climates; a drunken person, in fact, is never seen", (Geikie's Life of Christ). The sin of drunkenness, however, must have been not uncommon in the olden times, for it is mentioned either metaphorically or literally more than seventy times in the Bible. A drink-offering of wine was presented with the daily sacrifice (Ex. 29:40, 41), and also with the offering of the first-fruits (Lev. 23:13), and with various other sacrifices (Num. 15:5, 7, 10). Wine was used at the celebration of the Passover. And when the Lord's Supper was instituted, the wine and the unleavened bread then on the paschal table were by our Lord set apart as memorials of his body and blood. Several emphatic warnings are given in the New Testament against excess in the use of wine (Luke 21:34; Rom. 13:13; Eph. 5:18; 1 Tim. 3:8; Titus 1:7).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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