winningness

winning

[win-ing]
noun
1.
the act of a person or thing that wins.
2.
Usually, winnings. something that is won, especially money.
3.
Mining.
a.
any opening by which coal is being or has been extracted.
b.
a bed of coal ready for mining.
adjective
4.
that wins; successful or victorious, as in a contest: the winning team.
5.
charming; engaging; pleasing: a winning child; a winning smile.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English (noun); see win, -ing1, -ing2

winningly, adverb
winningness, noun
unwinning, adjective


5. captivating, attractive, winsome.


1, 4. losing. 5. repulsive.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
winning (ˈwɪnɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  (of a person, character, etc) charming, engaging, or attractive: winning ways; a winning smile
2.  gaining victory: the winning stroke
 
n
3.  a.  a shaft or seam of coal
 b.  the extraction of coal or ore from the ground
4.  (plural) money, prizes, or valuables won, esp in gambling
 
'winningly
 
adv
 
'winningness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

win
fusion of O.E. winnan "struggle for, work at, strive, fight," and gewinnan "to gain or succeed by struggling, to win," both from P.Gmc. *wenwanan (cf. O.S. winnan, O.N. vinna, O.Fris. winna, Du. winnen "to gain, win," Dan. vinde "to win," O.H.G. winnan "to strive, struggle, fight," Ger. gewinnen "to
gain, win," Goth. gawinnen "to suffer, toil"). Perhaps related to wish, or from PIE *van- "overcome, conquer." Sense of "to be victorious" is recorded from c.1300. The noun in O.E. meant "labor, strife, conflict;" modern sense of "a victory in a game or contest" is first attested 1862, from the verb. Breadwinner (see bread) preserves the sense of "toil" in O.E. winnan. Phrase you can't win them all (1954) first attested in Raymond Chandler.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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