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withdraw

[with-draw, with-] /wɪðˈdrɔ, wɪθ-/
verb (used with object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
1.
to draw back, away, or aside; take back; remove:
She withdrew her hand from his. He withdrew his savings from the bank.
2.
to retract or recall:
to withdraw an untrue charge.
3.
to cause (a person) to undergo withdrawal from addiction to a substance.
verb (used without object), withdrew, withdrawn, withdrawing.
4.
to go or move back, away, or aside; retire; retreat:
to withdraw from the room.
5.
to remove oneself from some activity, competition, etc.:
He withdrew before I could nominate him.
6.
to cease using or consuming an addictive narcotic (followed by from):
to withdraw from heroin.
7.
Parliamentary Procedure. to remove an amendment, motion, etc., from consideration.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English withdrawen. See with-, draw
Related forms
withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
withdrawingness, noun
nonwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawable, adjective
unwithdrawing, adjective
Synonyms
2. revoke, rescind, disavow. 4. See depart.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for withdrawing
  • Waves beat on the shore, rushing up the pebbly beach and withdrawing with a caressing hiss.
  • Later that evening, he sent an e-mail saying that he is withdrawing the offer because he could not wait any longer.
  • In these situations, the probability of withdrawing prematurely is minimum.
  • After their first entrance they remained before the spectators, without withdrawing, until the end of the piece.
  • Then withdrawing to the hall of carousal, they sat and drank and caroused and kissed each other in perfect bliss.
  • There had been rumors of its unsoundness for some time, and depositors had been withdrawing their money freely for several days.
  • People withdrawing from methadone may be placed on long-term maintenance.
  • The hostility, lab sabotage and tension, and slimy viciousness led to that student withdrawing from his doctoral degree.
  • Compare fees based on the rates for withdrawing money and making transactions.
  • For a bank to boost capital by withdrawing credit or exiting important business lines would be counterproductive.
British Dictionary definitions for withdrawing

withdraw

/wɪðˈdrɔː/
verb -draws, -drawing, -drew, -drawn
1.
(transitive) to take or draw back or away; remove
2.
(transitive) to remove from deposit or investment in a bank, building society, etc
3.
(transitive) to retract or recall (a statement, promise, etc)
4.
(intransitive) to retire or retreat: the troops withdrew
5.
(intransitive) often foll by from. to back out (of) or depart (from): he withdrew from public life
6.
(intransitive) to detach oneself socially, emotionally, or mentally
Derived Forms
withdrawable, adjective
withdrawer, noun
Word Origin
C13: from with (in the sense: away from) + draw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for withdrawing

withdraw

v.

early 13c., "to take back," from with "away" + drawen "to draw," possibly a loan-translation of Latin retrahere "to retract." Sense of "to remove oneself" is recorded from c.1300.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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