wondrous

[wuhn-druhs]
adjective
1.
wonderful; remarkable.
adverb
2.
Archaic. wonderfully; remarkably.

Origin:
1490–1500; metathetic variant of Middle English wonders (genitive of wonder) wonderful; cognate with German Wunders; spelling conformed to -ous

wondrously, adverb
wondrousness, noun
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World English Dictionary
wondrous (ˈwʌndrəs)
 
adj
1.  exciting wonder; marvellous
 
adv
2.  (intensifier): it is wondrous cold
 
'wondrously
 
adv
 
'wondrousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wondrous
c.1500, from M.E. wonders (adj.), c.1300, originally gen. of wonder (n.), with suffix altered by influence of marvelous, etc.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
You're moving into a wondrous land where shadow often overshadows substance.
Illusions push the mysterious and wondrous brain into revealing its secrets.
Thought to optimize levels of dopamine and norepinephrine, enhancing
  concentration and turning mundane tasks into wondrous ones.
To this day the catacombs include a wondrous variety of human-made features.
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