wood-chuck

woodchuck

[wood-chuhk]
noun
a stocky North American burrowing rodent, Marmota monax, that hibernates in the winter.
Also called chuck, groundhog.


Origin:
1665–75, Americanism; presumably a reshaping by folk etymology of a word in a Southern New England Algonquian language; compare Narragansett (E spelling) ockqutchaun woodchuck

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World English Dictionary
woodchuck (ˈwʊdˌtʃʌk)
 
n
Also called: groundhog a North American marmot, Marmota monax, having coarse reddish-brown fur
 
[C17: by folk etymology from Cree otcheck fisher, marten]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

woodchuck
1674, alteration (influenced by wood (n.)) of Cree (Algonquian) otchek or Ojibwa otchig, "marten," the name subsequently transferred to the groundhog.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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