follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

wounded

[woon-did] /ˈwun dɪd/
adjective
1.
suffering injury or bodily harm, as a laceration or bullet wound:
to bandage a wounded hand.
2.
marred; impaired; damaged:
a wounded reputation.
noun
3.
wounded persons collectively (often preceded by the):
to treat the wounded.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English; Old English gewundode. See wound1, -ed2
Related forms
self-wounded, adjective
unwounded, adjective

wound1

[woond; Older Use and Literary wound] /wund; Older Use and Literary waʊnd/
noun
1.
an injury, usually involving division of tissue or rupture of the integument or mucous membrane, due to external violence or some mechanical agency rather than disease.
2.
a similar injury to the tissue of a plant.
3.
an injury or hurt to feelings, sensibilities, reputation, etc.
verb (used with object)
4.
to inflict a wound upon; injure; hurt.
verb (used without object)
5.
to inflict a wound.
Idioms
6.
lick one's wounds, to attempt to heal one's injuries or soothe one's hurt feelings after a defeat.
Origin
before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English wund; cognate with Old High German wunta (German Wunde), Old Norse und, Gothic wunds; (v.) Middle English wounden, Old English wundian, derivative of the noun
Related forms
woundedly, adverb
woundingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. cut, stab, laceration, lesion, trauma. See injury. 3. insult, pain, anguish. 4. harm, damage; cut, stab, lacerate.

wound2

[wound] /waʊnd/
verb
1.
a simple past tense and past participle of wind2. and wind3 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for wounded
  • Many people consider themselves the walking wounded.
  • It's as if they are suddenly wounded puppies on their way to the pound, never to be seen again.
  • Why the instinct to clutch a wounded part of the body helps to relieve discomfort.
  • It has given me a prospective of how it is possible to live a magnificent life even if infinitely flawed or wounded.
  • Your husband is tracking a wounded gazelle and could be gone for days.
  • wounded crickets can attract other crickets foraging for protein and salt-and the healthy crickets are happy to become cannibals.
  • Researchers have found that wild meerkats will bring dead or wounded scorpions to their pups to practice with.
  • The fierce carnivore tracks the wounded creature and dines at its leisure once the prey collapses.
  • Others have been badly wounded after being charged unprovoked.
  • No doubt, there was another wounded elephant, fleeing in frantic terror.
British Dictionary definitions for wounded

wounded

/ˈwuːndɪd/
adjective
1.
  1. suffering from wounds; injured, esp in a battle or fight
  2. (as collective noun; preceded by the) the wounded
2.
(of feelings) damaged or hurt

wound1

/wuːnd/
noun
1.
any break in the skin or an organ or part as the result of violence or a surgical incision
2.
an injury to plant tissue
3.
any injury or slight to the feelings or reputation
verb
4.
to inflict a wound or wounds upon (someone or something)
Derived Forms
woundable, adjective
wounder, noun
wounding, adjective
woundingly, adverb
woundless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English wund; related to Old Frisian wunde, Old High German wunta (German Wunde), Old Norse und, Gothic wunds

wound2

/waʊnd/
verb
1.
the past tense and past participle of wind2
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for wounded

wound

n.

Old English wund "hurt, injury," from Proto-Germanic *wundaz (cf. Old Saxon wunda, Old Norse und, Old Frisian wunde, Old High German wunta, German wunde "wound"), perhaps from PIE root *wen- "to beat, wound."

v.

Old English wundian, from the source of wound (n.). Cognate with Old Frisian wundia, Middle Dutch and Dutch wonden, Old High German wunton, German verwunden, Gothic gawundon. Figurative use from c.1200. Related: Wounded; wounding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
wounded in Medicine

wound (wōōnd)
n.

  1. Injury to a part or tissue of the body, especially one caused by physical trauma and characterized by tearing, cutting, piercing, or breaking of the tissue.

  2. An incision.


wound v.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for wounded

wounded

Related Terms

walking wounded


wound

adjective phrase

Tense; anxious; on edge: She was a tall, angular woman, tightly wound, with a Nefertiti profile and hands made for scratching (1788+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with wounded
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for wounded

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for wounded

12
14
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with wounded