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wring

[ring] /rɪŋ/
verb (used with object), wrung, wringing.
1.
to twist forcibly:
He wrung the chicken's neck.
2.
to twist and compress, or compress without twisting, in order to force out water or other liquid (often followed by out):
to wring clothes.
3.
to extract or expel by twisting or compression (usually followed by out or from).
4.
to affect painfully by or as if by some contorting or compressing action.
5.
to clasp tightly with or without twisting:
to wring one's hands in pain.
6.
to force (usually followed by off) by twisting.
7.
to extract or get by forceful effort or means (often followed by out).
verb (used without object), wrung, wringing.
8.
to perform the action of wringing something.
9.
to writhe, as in anguish.
noun
10.
a wringing; forcible twist or squeeze.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English wringen, Old English wringan; cognate with German ringen to wrestle
Related forms
outwring, verb (used with object), outwrung, outwringing.
Can be confused
ring, wring (see synonym study at ring)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wringing
  • We will carry on wringing our hands, making half-hearted attempts to alleviate the problem.
  • It's time for solutions, time to stop wringing our hands and lamenting our dilemma.
  • The book's findings sparked both controversy and hand-wringing.
  • The same hand-wringing about online learning reminds me of the early days of computers.
  • Many will not, particularly those who think insurers are wringing them dry.
  • It's better to get some revenue for something extremely important rather than hand wringing for another year.
  • There was also much hand-wringing about money, as governments and taxpayers in rich countries feel the pinch.
  • Instead of back-slapping and sky-punching there is hand-wringing and uncertainty.
  • wringing extra copper out of existing mines has its difficulties too.
  • There will be plenty of hand-wringing in the years ahead.
British Dictionary definitions for wringing

wring

/rɪŋ/
verb wrings, wringing, wrung
1.
(often foll by out) to twist and compress to squeeze (a liquid) from (cloth, etc)
2.
(transitive) to twist forcibly: wring its neck
3.
(transitive) to clasp and twist (one's hands), esp in anguish
4.
(transitive) to distress: wring one's heart
5.
(transitive) to grip (someone's hand) vigorously in greeting
6.
(transitive) to obtain by or as if by forceful means: wring information out of
7.
(intransitive) to writhe with or as if with pain
8.
wringing wet, soaking; drenched
noun
9.
an act or the process of wringing
Word Origin
Old English wringan; related to Old High German ringan (German wringen), Gothic wrungō snare. See wrangle, wrong
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wringing

wring

v.

Old English wringan "press, strain, wring, twist" (class III strong verb; past tense wrang, past participle wrungen), from Proto-Germanic *wrenganan (cf. Old English wringen "to wring, press out," Old Frisian wringa, Middle Dutch wringhen, Dutch wringen "to wring," Old High German ringan "to move to and fro, to twist," German ringen "to wrestle"), from PIE *wrengh- "to turn," nasalized variant of *wergh- "to turn," from root *wer- (3) "to turn, bend" (see versus).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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