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Y, y

[wahy] /waɪ/
noun, plural Y's or Ys, y's or ys.
1.
the 25th letter of the English alphabet, a semivowel.
2.
any spoken sound represented by the letter Y or y, as in yet, city, or rhythm.
3.
something having the shape of a Y .
4.
a written or printed representation of the letter Y or y.
5.
a device, as a printer's type, for reproducing the letter Y or y.

Y

[wahy] /waɪ/
1.
the Y, Informal. the YMCA, YWCA, YMHA, or YWHA.

Y

1.
yen1 (def 1).

Y

Symbol.
1.
the 25th in order or in a series, or, when I is omitted, the 24th.
2.
(sometimes lowercase) the medieval Roman numeral for 150.
Compare Roman numerals.
3.
(sometimes lowercase) Electricity, admittance.
4.
Chemistry, yttrium.
5.
Biochemistry, tyrosine.

y

Symbol, Mathematics
1.
an unknown quantity.
2.
(in Cartesian coordinates) the y-axis.

y-

1.
a prefix occurring in certain obsolete words (ywis) and especially in archaic past participles:
yclad.
Also, i-.
Origin
Middle English y-, i- (reduced variant a-), Old English ge-, prefix with perfective, intensifying, or collective force; cognate with Old Frisian, Old Saxon ge-, gi-, Gothic ga-, German ge-; compare perhaps Latin com- com-

-y1

1.
a native English suffix of adjectives meaning “characterized by or inclined to” the substance or action of the word or stem to which the suffix is attached: juicy; grouchy; rumbly; dreamy. Sometimes used to mean “allowing, fostering, or bringing about” the specified action:
sippy.
Also, -ey1 .
Origin
Old English -ig; cognate with German -ig; compare perhaps Latin -icus, Greek -ikos

-y2

1.
a noun-forming suffix with a variety of functions in contemporary English, added to monosyllabic bases to create words that are almost always informal. Its earliest use, probably still productive, was to form endearing or familiar names or common nouns from personal names, other nouns, and adjectives (Billy; Susie; birdie; doggie; granny; sweetie; tummy). The hypocoristic feature is absent in recent coinages, however, which are simply informal and sometimes pejorative (boonies; cabby; groupie; hippy; looie; Okie; preemie; preppy; rookie). Another function of -y2, (-ie) is to form from adjectives nouns that denote exemplary or extreme instances of the quality named by the adjective (baddie; biggie; cheapie; toughie), sometimes focusing on a restricted, usually unfavorable sense of the adjective (sharpie; sickie; whitey). A few words in which the informal character of -y2, (-ie) has been lost are now standard in formal written English (goalie; movie).
Also, -ie.
Compare -o, -sy.
Origin
late Middle English (Scots), orig. in names; of uncertain origin; baby and puppy, now felt as having this suffix, may be of different derivation

-y3

1.
a suffix of various origins used in the formation of action nouns from verbs (inquiry), also found in other abstract nouns:
carpentry; infamy.
Origin
representing Latin -ia, -ium; Greek -ia, -eia, -ion; French -ie; German -ie

y.

1.
yard; yards.
2.
year; years.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for y

y

/waɪ/
noun (pl) y's, Y's, Ys
1.
the 25th letter of the modern English alphabet
2.
a speech sound represented by this letter, in English usually a semivowel, as in yawn, or a vowel, as in symbol or shy
3.
  1. something shaped like a Y
  2. (in combination): a Y-cross

y

symbol
1.
the y-axis or a coordinate measured along the y-axis in a Cartesian coordinate system
2.
an algebraic variable

Y

symbol
1.
any unknown, unspecified, or variable factor, number, person, or thing
2.
(chem) yttrium
3.
(currency)
  1. yen
  2. yuan

y.

abbreviation
1.
year

Y.

abbreviation
1.
YMCA or YWCA

-y1

suffix
1.
(from nouns) characterized by; consisting of; filled with; relating to; resembling: sunny, sandy, smoky, classy
2.
(from verbs) tending to; acting or existing as specified: leaky, shiny
Word Origin
from Old English -ig, -ǣg

-y2

suffix (informal)
1.
denoting smallness and expressing affection and familiarity: a doggy, a granny, Jamie
2.
a person or thing concerned with or characterized by being: a groupie, a fatty
Word Origin
C14: from Scottish -ie, -y, familiar suffix occurring originally in names, as in Jamie (James)

-y3

suffix
1.
(from verbs) indicating the act of doing what is indicated by the verbal element: inquiry
2.
(esp with combining forms of Greek, Latin, or French origin) indicating state, condition, or quality: geography, jealousy
Word Origin
from Old French -ie, from Latin -ia
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for y

Y

a late-developing letter in English. Called ipsilon in German, upsilon in Greek, the English name is of obscure origin. The sound at the beginning of yard, yes, yield, etc. is from Old English words with initial g- as in got and y- as in yet, which were considered the same sound and often transcribed as a character that looks something like 3 (but with a flat top and lower on the line of text), known as yogh. The system was altered by French scribes, who brought over the continental use of -g- and from the early 1200s used -y- and sometimes -gh- to replace 3. There's a good, in-depth discussion of yogh here. As short for YMCA, YWCA, YMHA first recorded 1915.

y-

perfective prefix, in y-clept, etc.; a deliberate archaism, introduced by Spenser and his imitators, representing an authentic Middle English prefix, from Old English ge-, originally meaning "with, together" but later a completive or perfective element, from Proto-Germanic *ga-. It is still living in German and Dutch ge-, and survives, disguised, in some English words (e.g. alike, aware, handiwork).

-y

noun suffix, in army, city, country, etc., from Old French -e, Latin -atus, -atum, pp. suffix of verbs of the first conjugation. In victory, history, etc. it represents Latin -ia, Greek -ia.

adjective suffix, "full of or characterized by," from Old English -ig, from Proto-Germanic *-iga (cf. German -ig), cognate with Greek -ikos, Latin -icus.

suffix in pet proper names (e.g. Johnny, Kitty), first recorded in Scottish, c.1400; became frequent in English 15c.-16c. Extension to surnames seems to date from c.1940. Use with common nouns seems to have begun in Scottish with laddie (1546) and become popular in English due to Burns' poems, but the same formation appears to be represented much earlier in baby and puppy.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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y in Medicine

Y
The symbol for the element yttrium.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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y in Science
Y  
The symbol for yttrium.
yttrium
  (ĭt'rē-əm)   
Symbol Y
A silvery metallic element found in the same ores as elements of the lanthanide series. Yttrium is used to strengthen magnesium and aluminum alloys, to provide the red color in color televisions, and as a component of various optical and electronic devices. Atomic number 39; atomic weight 88.906; melting point 1,522°C; boiling point 3,338°C; specific gravity 4.45 (25°C); valence 3. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for y

-y

Related Terms

-ie


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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y in Technology

1. General purpose language syntactically like RATFOR, semantically like C. Lacks structures and pointers. Used as a source language for Jack W. Davidson and Christopher W. Fraser's peephole optimiser which inspired GCC RTL and other optimisation ideas.
(ftp://ftp.cs.princeton.edu/pub/y+po.tar.Z). It is a copy of the original distribution from the University of Arizona during the early 80's, totally unsupported.
["The Y Programming Language", D.R. Hanson, SIGPLAN Notices 16(2):59-68 (Feb 1981)].
[Jack W. Davidson and Christopher W. Fraser, "The Design and Application of a Retargetable Peephole Optimiser", TOPLAS, Apr. 1980].
[Jack W. Davidson, "Simplifying Code Through Peephole Optimisation" Technical Report TR81-19, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 1981].
[Jack W. Davidson and Christopher W. Fraser, "Register Allocation and Exhaustive Peephole Optimisation" Software-Practice and Experience, Sep. 1984].
2. See fixed point combinator.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Related Abbreviations for y

y

yen

Y

  1. admittance
  2. hypercharge
  3. year
  4. YMCA
  5. YMHA
  6. YWCA
  7. YWHA
  8. young
  9. yttrium

y.

year
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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