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yore

[yawr, yohr] /yɔr, yoʊr/
noun
1.
Chiefly Literary. time past:
knights of yore.
adverb
2.
Obsolete. of old; long ago.
Origin of yore
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English geāra
Can be confused
yore, your, you're.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for yore
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • On one subject alone, Maltravers was less eloquent than of yore.

    Ernest Maltravers, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • He no longer treated Bongrand in the wheedling, respectful manner of yore.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • Monsieur de Bourbonne belonged to the species Fossil, and used the language of the days of yore.

    Madame Firmiani Honore de Balzac
  • A very good time it was, cattle selling higher than of yore.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
  • Those hooked by my crew were perhaps the tyrrhena pirates "turned into dolphins" in the days of yore.

    Voyage of the Liberdade Captain Joshua Slocum
British Dictionary definitions for yore

yore

/jɔː/
noun
1.
time long past (now only in the phrase of yore)
adverb
2.
(obsolete) in the past; long ago
Word Origin
Old English geāra, genitive plural of gēaryear; see hour
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for yore

Old English geara (adv.) "of yore," originally genitive plural of gear (see year), and used without of.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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7
6
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